Archive for the ‘Newsletter’ Category

December 2015 / January 2016

Monday, January 11th, 2016
CNY Triangle Logo
CNY TRI CLUB
Newsletter
December 2015/January 2016
From the President
Dear CNY Tri Club members,
It’s all about you…
Actually, it’s all about us. Our community of athletes. Our club. We are a collection of people with a common interest and goal. That’s why this club exists. Check out our Facebook page and the pictures and posts. You will see your friends, your fellow athletes and club members posting comments and pictures. Look at our website and see the classes that are offered at our Winter Training Facility (WTF), all of them taught by volunteer members of our club. Look at our summer weeknight training at three sites on two different nights, staffed by volunteers and directors who commit to an entire season of giving us a place to train and socialize with our friends and fellow athletes. Open water swims. Our own triathlon. Kids Tri training. All of this and more made possible by club members who got involved and made it possible for the rest of us.

This letter is meant to reach out to you, our members, to remind you of the fellowship and participation that make this club great. Let’s keep it great; better yet, let’s improve this club by getting more involved and making it even better!

We have a club of doers. You are athletes, and by definition you participate–let’s channel some of that positive energy and ability into our club. The board has some ideas, but we are looking for more and we know our talented members can help with that.

We are looking for people to get involved with starting a Teen Tri Training program this summer, people to lead computrainer classes, regular classes, social media and website people who can share our current news and interests. I often say “Is this club great or what!?!” It is, and so are we.

Contact me at president@cnytriathlon.org if you want to be involved in keeping this club great. Let’s make it greater together! Oh, and don’t forget to renew your membership for 2016!
Happy Training!
Ken Geary
President
On Deck Swim Coaching

We asked, you answered and we listened. Based on our survey results, our members want more swim training opportunities. So we have set up an eight-week swim training plan that includes weekly on deck coaching and swim workouts. Athletes will have access to USAT Certified coach Mike Corona once per week for eight weeks; likely Thursday nights at 7 p.m. The program is anticipated to start Jan. 7 and will run each Thursday for eight weeks at a location to be determined. The fee is a very affordable $100.

Athletes will receive custom swim workouts designed to improve fitness and make everyone faster come race day. Athletes will also learn the difference between swimming faster in a pool, and being faster in open water…and the difference is huge.
We are still arranging details for the program; if you have any questions, want to stay informed as the program develops or sign up, email Mike: corona_michael “at” hotmail.com.
Space will be limited to 12-20 swimmers, depending on lanes.
Next Board Meeting: Sunday, January 10, 6 p.m., WTF
Winter Training Facility Is Open!
The CNY Triathlon Club Winter Training Facility (WTF) provides a unique venue for wintertime training. The WTF is located in the Community Wing of Shoppingtown Mall, DeWitt. The space is equipped with 50 Kurt Kinetic trainers, sound system, two large- screen video monitors, projector, a CD/DVD player and a disco ball (yes, you read that right). Bring your bike, water bottle, towel and your desire to have a great workout.
The WTF is available for use free of charge to current members* of the CNY Triathlon Club.

*Registration for 2016 club membership is open. Membership is good for the calendar year (January 1 to December 31). If you are a current member, your membership will expire on December 31 regardless of when, during 2015, you registered. If you register/renew now for a 2016 membership, you are a member until December 31, 2016.

 

Important Details
  • You can park in the parking garage by Sears and enter the mall at “Entrance #6.” Walk your bike down the side hallway to the WTF (it’ll be right in front of you. Don’t go up the escalators).
  • When the parking lot is wet or snow covered, carry your bike up to the mall entrance and roll your bike the rest of the way to the WTF. We want to keep the trainers corrosion free.
  • If you have never used a bike trainer, no worries! It is easy and the leader of the session will show you how to set up your bike. Note: If your bike doesn’t have the correct bike skewer, you can purchase one for $10.
  • If you do not have a trainer at home and plan to use the WTF frequently, we are allowing members to leave their bike at the WTF for a small fee. To use this service costs $20 per bike/member (more info below).
  • At the end of the season you can pick up your bike to get outdoors! Note: The CNY Tri club is not responsible for items lost or stolen that are being kept at the WTF. It is also the responsibility of the member to pick up their bike during open WTF hours.
  • Bring your water bottle pre-filled from home. If coming to yoga, bring a mat, but there are mats available at the WTF.
  • The WTF does have a few small changing areas.
  • Be sure to sign in for each session at the front table.
  • Arrive 15 minutes early to set up your bike.
  • Check the Club Calendar on our website for cancellations.

WINTER BIKE ROOM

Similar to last year, we are allowing members to leave their bike at the WTF so you don’t have to drag your bike back and forth to attend classes for the winter season.

We have space to store up to 75 bikes for the season for a small fee of $20. Bike storage is on a first come, first served basis.

If you weren’t able to make the early bird drop off on Nov. 1, check with your class instructor on spots available and to register.

2015-2016 WTF Classes

Mondays, 6 p.m. Cycle with Sam Sampere. Expect a workout personalized to your current fitness level. The best way to accomplish this is to use a speedometer mounted on your rear wheel. A cadence sensor is a valuable tool as well. You are guaranteed to participate in some of the toughest cycling classes you will ever take, and you’ll actually measure your progress throughout the winter season with periodic testing. If you want to hit spring ready to ride outdoors in the best shape ever, you will want to attend this coached practice. This is for riders of all abilities regardless of experience.

Tuesdays, 6 p.m. Yoga with Lisa Baker. Lisa teaches a dynamic vinyasa flow class, with options for everyone from Ironman to Irongirl. You can expect to build strength, symmetry and balance in an easy, friendly environment. Dynamic vinyasa flow means that you will move throughout the class. Everyone is welcome. Please wear layered clothing as it can be cold in the WTF and bring a yoga mat, blocks and a strap if you have them, and a large beach towel.
Wednesdays, 6 p.m. Cycle with Rich O’Neil. Wednesdays will feature high intensity, pushing aerobic limits for those who choose to take on the challenge. However, all are welcome to participate. Leave your comfort zone at a moderate effort, stay just below the maximum or settle in at a leisurely exercise pace. Join us and be active.
Thursdays, 6 p.m. Cycle with Keone. I promise you will have fun in my class and you will be challenged. Being a swimmer that loves to bike means I teach like a swimmer: I love intervals. We will start the season slow (because I need to get my bike legs back) and build from there. Remember, the beauty of being indoors is you are just as fast as everyone else in the room. Plus, it is a great time to work on drills that you make you a better biker. I will have upbeat music and plenty of variety so the hour will go by quickly. I will motivate and challenge you, but in the end, your workout depends on the effort you put into it. Bring two bottles of water. You will need them.
Saturdays, 7 a.m. Cycle with Kristen Roe. I will be team teaching with Ed TenEyck, alternating weekends due to other commitments. Classes will range from 75 minutes the first month and will build to 90 minutes as time goes on–longer if we have time and people want to stay and ride. Class will be intense but fun. If athletes have power meters or heart rate monitors we will hold a class for testing and designating training zones.

Saturdays, 9 a.m. Cycle with Colleen Farrell. Colleen will lead the second Saturday class. This class will help you to build your cycling base throughout the winter.  We’ll start out at about 60 minutes, and throughout the winter work up to three hours on the trainer (you can drop in for some, or all, of the longer classes). We’ll do lots of different training to keep it fun: pyramids, tabata, you name it, it will be done on the bike.

 

Be sure to check the website for added classes or cancellations: Winter Training Facility. If you have questions, email: wtf@cnytriathlon.org.
Tri PT by Troy

Can an airplane help you run better?

This feature brings training and injury prevention advice to Tri Club members. If you have any questions for Troy, please contact the editor at newsletter@cnytriathlon.org and I will pass them along.

Yes, an airplane (scale exercise) can help you run better. Being able to perform this exercise in both static and dynamic motion will help you develop the proper muscle function for running and all sports.

Running puts high demands on the lower extremities involving strength, stability and kinetic function. Not rocket science. But here is a little bit of science that will help you get your running form and training off the ground. Elite runners use the mechanical advantage proper joint/body alignment and the hidden energy in the muscles to generate optimal energy. This is best achieved with proper muscle balance in all types of muscle contractions: isometric, concentric and eccentric.

For most of us, 99.9% of the exercises we perform will focus on the concentric type, shortening the muscle while tightening it and getting forces to lift or propel our body. We need to address the other two types with focus to balance not only the individual muscles, but the muscle groups and patterns that work together for movement.

An eccentric contraction can use the muscles lengthening against force to absorb and store energy to generate more force for the concentric contraction. An isometric contraction, where the muscle remains the same length, will stabilize the joint/body to allow the muscles to have a solid platform to generate force.

The airplane is one exercise that will create muscle balance in more ways than one. It can create balance of contractions within an individual muscle, equalize the co-contractions between muscles around joints to stabilize them and synchronize muscle contractions in specific patterns to make them more efficient. The concept of the airplane exercise is still not rocket science, but pretty cool if you’re a sports performance nerd like me.

By the way, all the stuff I just talked about for the airplane exercise is an excellent way to prevent injuries. That’s the physical therapy nerd in me.

OK, so how do we do this amazing magical airplane exercise?
  • Stand up tall with feet together and arms out to the side at shoulder height
  • Lean forward, keeping head and chest up, and lift one leg straight back
  • Maintain back leg straight and try to get parallel with the floor
  • Balance in airplane scale for 5 seconds then place toe of the back foot to the heel of the front foot
  • Repeat airplane scale moving front foot backwards
  • Do 2-3 sets of 10 steps backwards
Race hard, train smart, be safe.
Troy
Athlete Profile
Jade Mills   
Tell us about yourself. I’m 36, and I was born and raised in Central New York, and work as a personal trainer at Metro Fitness in downtown Syracuse. Other people say I’m the kind of person who is always looking for new adventures, whether it’s triathlon, ultramarathons or jumping out of planes. I suspect they think my life is more exciting than it really is. I have a great group of friends, and I love spending time with them, whether it’s hanging out while enjoying a glass of wine or getting together for a run, ride or swim. I love being in the woods, and doing things outdoors in general, like hiking and camping. I also enjoy reading and cooking; those are my noncompetitive hobbies.
How long have you been involved in triathlon and what made you take it up?  I’m going into my fourth year of direct involvement with the sport. It all started with coaching for the Fleet Feet Triathlon program. I was hooked pretty quickly, so after a season with that group I bought a bike and began training for my first triathlon.
Who is your hero? Quenton Cassidy, the main character of the novels Once a Runner, Again to Carthage, and Racing the Rain by John L. Parker Jr.
What is your athletic background? I began “play” running with a neighborhood friend when we were about 8 or 9 years old (we would stage pretend track meets in her back yard). Modified sports programs didn’t exist yet when I was in school, so I didn’t join a formal team of any sort until I was a freshman in high school. I played field hockey and ran indoor and outdoor track for Liverpool, and I continued with both track seasons when I went to college. After that, I was pretty much on my own working my way up through the distances.
What are your triathlon strengths and weaknesses? I’ve been a runner most of my life, so I am very strong for that leg, and I also do pretty well with the swim. My weakest leg is the bike, largely in part because it’s where I am the least experienced.
What was your first triathlon and what do you remember most? The intermediate distance at the Delta Lake Triathlon, and I remember being so glad to make it through the bike and into my running shoes. Having some of my closest friends at the finish line made the experience especially memorable.
What is your favorite race and why? It’s hard to come up with a favorite. I suppose Delta Lake Tri. It’s a well-executed race with a great atmosphere. The Cayuga Trails 50 is also at the top of my list. Love the challenge of all the crazy stair climbing on that course.
What was your worst race and why? 2006 New York City Marathon, because it was so frustratingly crowded. There was a bottleneck at every water stop that stopped me dead in my tracks.
What’s on your race calendar for 2016? The definites are on the Caumsett 50K and Cayuga Trails 50 Mile for some spring ultra marathons, and the Tupper Lake Tinman and the Delta Lake Double for tris. I will likely also do the Caz Tri intermediate race or another 70.3 race in late summer. Haven’t thought about the fall yet.
What are this year‘s goals? My spring ultras serve as the national championships for those distances, and I really want to improve from last year (seventh and sixth, respectively). Tinman Tupper Lake will be my first 70.3 and I want a really strong debut there. Also, to sign up for 2017 IMLP!
In five years you hope to… : Have my own log cabin in the woods, with a couple Ironman finishes under my belt and a national championship title in either the 50K or 50-mile distance.
Something most people don’t know about you. I’m actually a pretty shy person. I’ve learned to be outgoing because of my role as a trainer and coach, but it doesn’t come naturally.
 What triathlon has taught you. Chamois Butt’r is an amazing product. That, and it’s OK to be afraid of something (like flying down hills on a bike) but that fear will hold you back if you don’t keep working to get over it.
CNY Triathlon Club | Box 434 | Dewitt | NY | 13214

November 2015

Wednesday, November 4th, 2015

CNY Triangle Logo
CNY TRI CLUB
Newsletter
November 2015
From the President
Dear CNY Tri Club members,
The indoor season is upon us, and we are pleased to announce the opening of the Winter Training Facility. Our first classes started Monday, Nov. 2. Your membership entitles you to participate in the classes at no charge. You can check out our club calendar for schedule updates, and watch for announcements. Or, better yet, consult the schedule printed below.
We are lucky to have such a fantastic facility and Instructors who volunteer their time to lead these classes. If you are nervous about checking it out because you aren’t sure how to use a bike trainer, don’t worry! As you know from Weeknight Training our members are a friendly bunch, as are the awesome instructors, and they will show you the ropes.
We have some old friends and some new ones that will be leading classes this year, and they are excited about what we have planned for you. Some new classes and events are in the works as well; stay tuned.
Some of you may be wondering about the future of the facility given the news coverage regarding a reconfiguration of Shoppingtown Mall, but as of now, nothing has been finalized and we anticipate no changes this season.
I want to wish everyone a Happy Thanksgiving and hope to see you at the WTF this season.
Ken Geary
President
Next Board Meeting: Sunday, November 8, 6 p.m., WTF
Winter Training Facility Opens
The CNY Triathlon Club Winter Training Facility (WTF) provides a unique venue for wintertime training. The WTF is located in the Community Wing of Shoppingtown Mall, DeWitt. The space is equipped with 50 Kurt Kinetic trainers, sound system, two large- screen video monitors, projector, a CD/DVD player and a disco ball (yes, you read that right). Bring your bike, water bottle, towel and your desire to have a great workout.
The WTF is available for use free of charge to current members* of the CNY Triathlon Club.

*Registration for 2016 club membership is open. Membership is good for the calendar year (January 1 to December 31). If you are a current member, your membership will expire on December 31 regardless of when, during 2015, you registered. If you register/renew now for a 2016 membership, you are a member until December 31, 2016.

 

Important Details
  • You can park in the parking garage by Sears and enter the mall at “Entrance #6.” Walk your bike down the side hallway to the WTF (it’ll be right in front of you. Don’t go up the escalators).
  • When the parking lot is wet or snow covered, carry your bike up to the mall entrance and roll your bike the rest of the way to the WTF. We want to keep the trainers corrosion free.
  • If you have never used a bike trainer, no worries! It is easy and the leader of the session will show you how to set up your bike. Note: If your bike doesn’t have the correct bike skewer, you can purchase one for $10.
  • If you do not have a trainer at home and plan to use the WTF frequently, we are allowing members to leave their bike at the WTF for a small fee. To use this service costs $20 per bike/member (more info below).
  • At the end of the season you can pick up your bike to get outdoors! Note: The CNY Tri club is not responsible for items lost or stolen that are being kept at the WTF. It is also the responsibility of the member to pick up their bike during open WTF hours.
  • Bring your water bottle pre-filled from home. If coming to yoga, bring a mat, but there are mats available at the WTF.
  • The WTF does have a few small changing areas.
  • Be sure to sign in for each session at the front table.
  • Arrive 15 minutes early to set up your bike.
  • Check the Club Calendar on our website for cancellations.

WINTER BIKE ROOM

Similar to last year, we are allowing members to leave their bike at the WTF so you don’t have to drag your bike back and forth to attend classes for the winter season.

We have space to store up to 75 bikes for the season for a small fee of $20. Bike storage is on a first come, first served basis.

If you weren’t able to make the early bird drop off on Nov. 1, check with your class instructor on spots available and to register.

2015-2016 WTF Classes
Mondays, 6 p.m. Cycle with Sam Sampere. Expect a workout personalized to your current fitness level. The best way to accomplish this is to use a speedometer mounted on your rear wheel. A cadence sensor is a valuable tool as well. You are guaranteed to participate in some of the toughest cycling classes you will ever take, and you’ll actually measure your progress throughout the winter season with periodic testing. If you want to hit spring ready to ride outdoors in the best shape ever, you will want to attend this coached practice. This is for riders of all abilities regardless of experience.
 

Tuesdays, 5 p.m. No Equipment Needed Strength Class with Meredith Andrews. This class is appropriate for all fitness levels and modifications will be provided. You will use your own body weight to gain strength, power and flexibility. No equipment is needed but you may want to bring a yoga mat; a towel and water are recommended as well. Meredith is a physical education teacher as well as a Certified Group Fitness instructor.

Tuesdays, 6 p.m. Yoga with Lisa Baker. Lisa teaches a dynamic vinyasa flow class, with options for everyone from Ironman to Irongirl. You can expect to build strength, symmetry and balance in an easy, friendly environment. Dynamic vinyasa flow means that you will move throughout the class. Everyone is welcome. Please wear layered clothing as it can be cold in the WTF and bring a yoga mat, blocks and a strap if you have them, and a large beach towel.

Wednesdays, 6 p.m. Cycle with Rich O’Neil. Wednesdays will feature high intensity, pushing aerobic limits for those who choose to take on the challenge. However, all are welcome to participate. Leave your comfort zone at a moderate effort, stay just below the maximum or settle in at a leisurely exercise pace. Join us and be active.
Thursdays, 6 p.m. Cycle with Keone. I promise you will have fun in my class and you will be challenged. Being a swimmer that loves to bike means I teach like a swimmer: I love intervals. We will start the season slow (because I need to get my bike legs back) and build from there. Remember, the beauty of being indoors is you are just as fast as everyone else in the room. Plus, it is a great time to work on drills that you make you a better biker. I will have upbeat music and plenty of variety so the hour will go by quickly. I will motivate and challenge you, but in the end, your workout depends on the effort you put into it. Bring two bottles of water. You will need them.
Saturdays, 7 a.m. Cycle with Kristen Roe. I will be team teaching with Ed TenEyck, alternating weekends due to other commitments. Classes will range from 75 minutes the first month and will build to 90 minutes as time goes on–longer if we have time and people want to stay and ride. Class will be intense but fun. If athletes have power meters or heart rate monitors we will hold a class for testing and designating training zones.

Saturdays, 9 a.m. Cycle with Helene. We are excited to have Helene back! She will give you a great weekend workout to get you ready for race season. Our favorite substitute instructor Colleen will lead the first few classes as Helene finishes up her racing season. This class will help you to build your cycling base throughout the winter.  We’ll start out at about 60 minutes, and throughout the winter work up to three hours on the trainer (you can drop in for some, or all, of the longer classes). We’ll do lots of different training to keep it fun: pyramids, tabata, you name it, it will be done on the bike.

 

Be sure to check the website for added classes or cancellations: Winter Training Facility. If you have questions, email: wtf@cnytriathlon.org.
On Deck Swim Coaching

We asked, you answered and we listened. Based on our survey results, our members want more swim training opportunities. So we have set up an eight-week swim training plan that includes weekly on deck coaching and swim workouts. Athletes will have access to USAT Certified coach Mike Corona once per week for eight weeks; likely Thursday nights at 7 p.m. The program is anticipated to start Jan. 7 and will run each Thursday for eight weeks at a location to be determined. The fee is a very affordable $100.

Athletes will receive custom swim workouts designed to improve fitness and make everyone faster come race day. Athletes will also learn the difference between swimming faster in a pool, and being faster in open water…and the difference is huge.
We are still arranging details for the program; if you have any questions, want to stay informed as the program develops or sign up, email Mike: corona_michael “at” hotmail.com.

Space will be limited to 12-20 swimmers, depending on lanes.

Help Us Define Who We Are

Well written vision and mission statements are crucial to organizations. Without them, it is difficult to create and maintain a good organizational culture, attract and keep members, and make an impact in the community.

CNY Triathlon is embarking in a vision/mission process and we already have  dedicated athletes willing to help. Please let me know if you are interested in being part of the team: Tanya Gesek, gesekphd@gmail.com.

A Vision Statement:
  • Defines the optimal desired future state–the mental picture–of what an organization wants to achieve over time;
  • provides guidance and inspiration as to what an organization is focused on achieving in five, 10 or more years;
  • functions as the “north star” – -all members understand that their work every day ultimately contributes toward accomplishing the goal over the long term; and,
  • is written succinctly in an inspirational manner that makes it easy for all members to repeat at any given time. Leaders and volunteers come and go.  The vision remains constant.
A Mission Statement:
  • Defines the present state or purpose of an organization;
  • answers three queries about why an organization exists: What it does. What it stands for. How it does what it does;
  • is written succinctly in the form of a sentence or two, but for a shorter timeframe (one to three years) than a Vision Statement; and,
  • is something that all members should be able to articulate upon request.
Tri PT by Troy

Winter Training: WTF?
Yippee! It’s winter training time. Isn’t winter seven or eight months long in Syracuse? So what do you do with all this time? Do you continue training as if there is no winter, because you’re tough and if you don’t train you’ll go nuts? Or do you take time off and give in to old man winter? I say, neither.

Luckily for you, winter training can be used wisely to emerge in the spring fresh as a daisy. The best part is you get to use the WTF (the Tri Club’s own Winter Training Facility).

I’m writing this article not to promote the WTF (but it is a good idea). I’m writing this because when spring hits, all of the “not so race ready” patients/athletes show up at my office in a panic looking for treatment. That is when I say they should have used those winter months more wisely. So here is how to make the most of winter training: What is your health status? Do you need some extra rest, time off or treatment of injuries? Make yourself address health/injuries sooner rather than later; it makes treatment, life and training much easier.
  • Grade your performance. Did you perform on race day the way you wanted and train the way you wanted? If you did, awesome! If not, why not?
  • Assess your body’s strengths and weaknesses. Focus on strengthening your body’s weak points, as these usually lead to injury.
  • Investigate your training. Winter is the perfect time to try something different without risking your race performance. But don’t go wacky.
  • Plan out a time line to progress or change your winter training so you don’t get caught it a rut (mentally or physically). Ruts usually lead to overtraining and injury. That is what we are trying to avoid.

If that sounds like too much work there is another way to make winter training count. All of my injured patients and sports performance clients I see lack the same things–body balance, coordination and awareness. Yoga, Pilates, PiYo, Tai Chi, TRX and strength/fitness classes are just a few ways to make you a better athlete. Heck, standing on one foot and pumping your arms during TV commercials will help improve your body awareness for running.

Now is the time address those injuries, aches and pains you have been ignoring, try a new spin on your training and improve your body awareness.
Race hard, train smart, be safe.
Troy
CNY Triathlon Club | Box 434 | Dewitt | NY | 13214

August 2015 : issue 77

Tuesday, August 18th, 2015
SWIM
CNY Triangle Logo
CNY TRI CLUB
Newsletter
August 2015
Board Elections Held Aug. 16

We moved the CNY Triathlon Board Elections to Aug. 16, the same day as the Kids Tri and CNY Tri Club Picnic. This will allow our membership to have a more active role in selecting our leaders and shaping the direction of the club in the coming years. On the ballot each year will be all officer positions and six director positions.

 

The elections were held at the picnic, and a full slate of candidates were elected. Join us in welcoming some new faces to the board, and thanking those who have served in the past. A special thank-you to Bridgett Lichtinger  for her second term as President of the club. Bridgett is the epitome of what this club stands for. Thank you for contributing many hours to the club and giving us a wonderful and successful year!

 

An active board comprised of enthusiastic members is the only way to keep this club great, and this years slate of board members looks outstanding!

 

Offices                       Candidates

President                   Ken Geary

Vice-President          Tanya Gesek

Treasurer                   Mary Lou Plante

Secretary                   Molly English

 

Director                      Jill Poniros

Director                      Steve Plante

Director                      Meredith Andrews

Director                      Mike Corona

Director                      Cindy Mueller

Director                      Christine Brown

Next Board Meeting: Sunday, September 13, 6 p.m., WTF
Awesome Camera Donation/Giveaway!

 

The Rabin Law Firm donated and gave away three very cool bike cameras. One camera from the member list, one from the Picnic, and one strictly from the Volunteer list. It pays to volunteer!

 

Bike Lawyer Ben Rabin is a dedicated advocate for cyclist safety and donated several VERY cool cameras called Fly 6.  Check it out: Fly 6.
This camera/light replaces your existing taillight and records in real-time what happens behind you, so you can ride on worry free. Aggressive drivers are recorded and when the device senses a crash it will continue recording for another hour then shut off to preserve the data.

That’s Ben at right, holding the name of the winner of the first camera winner, Shirley Hartnett. Additional winners at the picnic were Jessica Geary, and Heather Nelson from the Volunteer list.  

Tri PT by Troy

This feature brings training and injury prevention advice to Tri Club members. If you have any questions for Troy, please contact the editor at newsletter@cnytriathlon.org and I will pass them along.

Foot Pain, Plantar Fasciitis and Why Feet Can Hurt

 

Everyone has heard of all the remedies to treat plantar fasciitis and foot pain. There are many reasons why feet can hurt. Is it the shoes? Running on the road? Overtraining? Bad socks? Bad genetics? Is it the way I run?

 

Well, nine times out of 10, it’s bad foot and ankle mechanics. Tight calves, weak toes and limited big toe movement affect foot and ankle mechanics, stressing the structures in the foot and causing pain.

 

Tight calf muscles cause limited ankle dorsiflexion movement and stress the attachment of the Achilles tendon where it connects to the heel. This can cause heel pain and spurring. Limited ankle movement also stresses and stretches out the plantar fascia during the shock absorption and push off phase of running, causing inflammation and pain.

 

Weak toe flexors (not able to make a strong fist with your toes) do not provide the proper stability and push off of the foot. The toes splay and arch can collapse, causing foot and ankle pronation. This can stress the foot and plantar fascia, causing inflammation and pain.

 

A stiff big toe, one that won’t bend backwards or flex down, makes the foot land wrong, limits foot roll and toe push off. This can cause pain on the ball of the foot, stress fractures in the foot and tight calves. Bunions also fall into this category.

 

So how can you prevent foot pain? Why, sitting down and watching classic movies, of course–Young Frankenstein, Die Hard and Stripes will provide the answers. Periodically checking calf flexibility, toe flexor strength and big toe movement is a good start. You can check all three while sitting in a chair.

  1. Calf flexibility. Sit up tall in a chair. Straighten out the knee and pull your toes toward the shin. If you feel a big pull in the calf or your foot/ankle does not bend up so your foot and shin make more than a 90 degree angle, you are at risk for foot pain. (The Young Frankenstein test–He could have outrun the angry mob and moaned much less if his calves weren’t so stiff from rigor mortis. This can also prevent knee, hip and low back pain. “Super Duper!”
  2. Toe flexor strength. Sit up tall in a chair with bare feet flat on the floor. If you can’t make a fist (curl up toes tight) or grab a towel with your toes, you are at risk for foot pain. (The John McClane/Die Hard test–he made fists in carpet to reduce stress from flying, which is why he had the strength to defeat the terrorist’s bare foot in Nakatomi Tower.” Yippee-ki-ay!” )
  3. Big toe stiffness. Sit up tall in a chair. Slide one foot back, bending your knee, letting the heel come off the floor while keeping the big toe on the floor. If your big toe does not bend up to 45 degrees, you are at risk for foot pain. (The Sargent Hulka/Stripes test–he was Bill Murray’s Big Toe during basic training, providing the flexibility to do some creative marching to pass “Army training, Sir.” Boom shack-a -lack-a.)
Troy Andrews PT, CES
Meet the Triathlete
Meredith Andrews

 

Tell us about yourself. I am 49 years young. I teach Physical Education at Wellwood Middle School in the Fayetteville-Manlius School District. I am originally from Liverpool and now live in Cicero.

 

How long have you been involved in triathlon and what made you take it up? I have been involved in the Iron Girl for five years and have also done the Gillie Girl. I had done a tri at SUNY Cortland (years ago) and it was something I always wanted to get back into. I was encouraged by Jill Poniros to try it and to join this great club.

 

Who is your hero? I don’t have one specific hero, but my husband and two sons are my heroes. They have always encouraged me to keep going for my goals and they are my biggest fans. They are at all of my races.

 

What is your athletic background? I have always been involved in organized sports since I was a little kid. Softball, track, soccer . . but most of all, the sport of rowing has been my lifelong passion. I rowed as a little kid with the Chargers Rowing Club and eventually grew up on the Liverpool High School Crew Team. I stopped growing in eighth grade, so my “rowing” was switched to being a coxswain for the team. To this day, I am involved with the Syracuse Chargers Rowing Club.

What are your triathlon strengths and weaknesses? Weakness is definitely the swim. I love the bike and run, love the freedom they give me.

 

What was your first triathlon and what do you remember most? My first triathlon was at SUNY Cortland. I loved it because the swimming was done in the pool!! After about 25 years, I decided to “tri” the Iron Girl. I remember how I felt as I saw the finish line and thinking to myself how glad I was still able to move and do something so physically challenging. BIG smile at the finish line!

 

What is your favorite race and why? I love the Iron Girl and Gillie Girl–those are the only ones I have tried so far. I love the feeling of watching athletes of so many different levels of ability push their bodies and minds past what they think they can do.

 

What was your worst race and why? I don’t have a worst race.

 

What races are on your race calendar for 2015? This year is just Iron Girl.

What are this year’s goals? My goal this year is to strengthen my swim and possibly participate in the Cazenovia Triathlon next year.

 

In five years you hope to …  I hope to be still able to move like I do. I also hope to be motivating people to continue to use their bodies and minds to make the best of what each can do.

 

Something most people don’t know about you. I am a Mickey Mouse fanatic! Love the Mouse. I want to be him at Disney World just once.

 

What triathlon has taught you: I have learned that the challenge is SO worth it.

Coach’s Corner
How Applying the Principals of “F”  
Can Help Your Approach to Training
By Karen Allen-Turner
As triathletes, our work ethic and sometimes overzealous nature can at times hamper our logical approach to training. This in turn can lead to one of the most frustrating issues for athletes to deal with, injuries. Running is where we see most of these injuries start to present themselves.

With that said, I like to apply what I call the “F” principles. Following in order, these five “F” principles of Function, Form, Frequency, Far and Fast will go a long way to helping you either return from injury or, more importantly, stay healthy in the first place.
Function first. Ensure that any pre-existing injuries have been addressed. While you might still be in the process of working through them, it is important to take time to assess how the injury might have developed in the first place. Was it from overtraining, introducing too much stress on the body too soon or was it from a biomechanical or structural imbalance? Once you have a clear understanding of the source of the problem, then it will help you in your process going forward.
This is where the importance of strength work comes into play. Strength work will help to rebuild the body. Even if you are one of the fortunate ones to have not suffered from injuries or “niggles,” strength work will help to ensure that your structure remains strong. Just like building a house–making sure that the mortar that connects the bricks is strong–it is necessary to ensure that the connective tissue–the ligaments, muscles and tendons that support your skeleton–is strong.
Form follows Function. If the body is able to move through the movement patterns correctly in a controlled environment such as the gym or at home, then applying good function to form will help tremendously. Swim, bike and run drills will help to reinforce good technique and are also low-risk forms of effective training.
Add Frequency, then Far. Keep workouts shorter and more frequent to provide a lower risk to injury, as opposed to increasing distance or duration too quickly., Instead of starting back with 3 x 3-mile runs for the week, try starting with 6 x 1.5-mile runs. This will still give you the same total distance but because the duration per workout is shorter, you will be able to maintain better form and suffer less fatigue afterwards. Additionally, being able to successfully achieve these shorter quality session goes a long way to helping you feel good about what you are doing. Slowly start to add distance while utilizing the 10% rule: this means limiting increases to your total distance or time by no more than 10% each week. This is especially important in regard to running.
Finally, include Fast. Short duration, interval-style sessions in which you increase your speed or heart rate for short, limited time periods will help your body to remember what it is like to go fast. This will also help to train both your neuromuscular and physiological systems for upcoming longer workouts more efficiently. An example of this for either running or biking may include 5 x 1-minute hard intervals with equal rest time between each.
Karen, of The Right Fit Multisports, is a Level 2 USAT coach and a former physical education teacher and business consultant who has been involved in the sport of triathlon for over 27 years. Karen’s experience with personal training, coaching and teaching has led to the success of many athletes. She is a regular main presenter across the country for USA Triathlon, helping to educate new coaches. Her knowledge, teaching methods and desire to help each individual obtain their goals are the focus of her programs. Finding the “right fit” for each individual is the recipe to success!Learn more at The Right Fit Multisports or follow the team on Facebook at The Right Fit Multisports.

July 2015 : issue 76

Thursday, July 16th, 2015
SWIM
CNY Triangle Logo
CNY TRI CLUB
Newsletter
July 2015
From the President
Dear Members,
Happy July!!

 

Mark your calendars for the biggest event of the summer! CNY Tri Club Picnic/Elections and CNY Tri Kids Race on Sunday, Aug. 16. Picnic is FREE for club members, but guests are more than welcome to attend for $10 per guest. Dinosaur Barbecue will be bringing their pit out again for some yummy grub! Register today — http://bit.ly/CNYPicnic2015.

 

Many of you might be wondering why we moved the picnic to mid-August. Well, we couldn’t get lifeguards after Aug. 23 and the Caz Triathlon is Aug. 22 (have you signed up yet?). So, that left Aug. 16 and we hope you can make it. Not only should you come out for the free food and fun, but to cheer our mini-triathletes on at the Kids Tri race. These kids are the future of the sport and watching them go out and give it their best is so inspiring.

 

Club elections will be held in conjunction with the picnic because we get a bigger turnout at the picnic. More details on the elections are included in this newsletter, but you will notice that Ken Geary will be running and stepping in as President for the club. I’ve enjoyed my time with the club and would like to thank all the members and the executive board for their support.

 

Train hard, train safe.
Bridget Lichtinger

 

Next Board Meeting: Monday, August 10, 6 p.m., WTF
Annual Picnic and Elections
Sunday, Aug. 16
Jamesville Beach
11:30 a.m. – 2 p.m.

 

COST: Free for Club Members. $10 per guest.

Registration deadline: Aug. 7

REGISTER TODAY: Club Picnic

At the picnic there will be a Rabin Law Firm giveaway of a very cool bike camera.

 

Bike Lawyer Ben Rabin is a dedicated advocate for cyclist safety and would like to give away one VERY cool camera called Fly 6. It is SO COOL. Check it out: Fly 6. This camera/light replaces your existing taillight and records in real-time what happens behind you, so you can ride on worry free. Aggressive drivers would be recorded and when the device senses a crash it will continue recording for another hour then shut off to preserve the data. To win it, all you have to do is come to the picnic! 
Open Water Swims
You MUST be a current member to participate and only 100 spots are available for each swim. Sign-ups will open a few weeks prior to OWS date.

 

Green Lakes (sprint distance) – wetsuit REQUIRED
Twilight Swim – August 1, 2015, 7pm swim start.

 

Jamesville Beach (.6, 1.2 or 2.4 miles) Endurance Swim. Participants MUST be able to swim the distance. July 18, 2015, swim starts at 7:30am. Use the Maintenance gate if the main entrance is closed.

 

Board Elections Set for Aug. 16

We have moved the CNY Triathlon Board Elections to Aug. 16, the same day as the Kids Tri and CNY Tri Club Picnic. This will allow our current membership a more active role in selecting our leaders and the direction of the club in the coming year. On the ballot will be all officer positions and six director positions.

 

Currently, we have a President, Vice-President and a Treasurer for the ballot, two current directors up for re-election and there is a candidate for director. Still, all 10 of these positions are up for nomination and election by the membership.

 

If you have any interest in running for office, submit your information or nomination to membership@cnytriathlon.org. Participate and keep this club great! An active board comprising enthusiastic members is the only way to retain the activities and events we have, and to create new ones in the future.

 

Offices                       Candidates

President                   Ken Geary

Vice-President          Tanya Gesek

Treasurer                   Mary Lou Plante

Secretary                   OPEN

 

Director                      Jill Poirnos

Director                      Steve Plante

Director                      Meredith Andrews

Director                      OPEN

Director                      OPEN

Director                      OPEN

Tri PT by Troy

This featurebrings training and injury prevention advice to Tri Club members. If you have any questions for Troy, please contact the editor at newsletter@cnytriathlon.org and I will pass them along.

 

Can You Shoulder the Load? 
Shoulder injuries are a very common and sometimes a chronic problem with triathletes. The repetitive dynamic and static stresses put on the shoulders during training and competing are unique to the three-event sport. The shoulder has no rest time through the entire race. It must have strength, stability, flexibility and stamina. The most common injuries are tendonitis and impingement. Rotator cuff tears, dislocations and traumatic injuries are a whole other topic.
POSTURE, POSTURE, POSTURE!!! Being able to attain and maintain proper posture is the most important key to good shoulder health. Without proper posture, shoulder mechanics break down and injury occurs. Notice I said “proper posture” and not “good posture.” Many times a person’s body awareness is affected and the idea of standing posture is distorted and overcorrected. Proper posture for the shoulder joint in standing and sitting is shoulders in line with ears with head and chest up but not extended. To attain and maintain proper posture you must have good muscular strength, tone and flexibility.
The most common posture issue is rounded shoulders, which have many causes: tight chest, tight biceps, weak shoulder blade muscles, weak spinal muscles and core weakness. It causes a change in shoulder mechanics affecting range of motion and strength that can pinch tendons, bursa and cartilage in the joint. Rounded shoulders also lead to over-stretched, tight and weak muscles, leading to increased stress and tendonitis.
Here are three warmup exercises to help address some of these issues during each event.
Swimming: Large shoulder circles with trunk rotation–stand with belly button pulled in and in proper posture. Extend arms down and spread fingers. Now rotate arms in a large circle one at a time like an exaggerated swim stroke. Maintain proper posture alignment during the exercise. Keep head chest and spine in alignment while rotating trunk. Do three sets, 30 seconds forwards and backwards.
Cycling: Planks on floor or countertop/bench (straight arms or on elbows/bent knee or straight legs)–with belly button pulled in and in proper posture. Maintain proper posture alignment during the exercise. Hold for as long as you can maintain good form. Do 3-5 reps.
Running: Runner’s arm swings (seated or standing)–Sit or stand with belly button pulled in and in proper posture. Bend elbows to ~ 90 degrees and swing arms at a comfortable pace as if running. Keep hands open and relaxed. Maintain proper posture alignment during the exercise. Do 3 sets for 30 seconds each.
So there are some words of wisdom on shoulder injuries and posture. Train hard, train smart and have good body awareness.
Troy Andrews PT, CES
The Athlete Profile will return in August.
Same goes for Coaches’ Corner.

June 2015 : issue 75

Tuesday, June 9th, 2015

SWIM
CNY Triangle Logo
CNY TRI CLUB
Newsletter
June 2015
From the President
Dear Members,
Time to get in the water!

June is here and it is time to start open water swimming (OWS) during Weeknight Training.

A few things to remember about OWS:

  • Training starts promptly at 6 p.m. and members must be checked-in and on the beach ready to go by 5:50.
  • Members must be marked. You will get marked with your number when you check in.
  • If there are a lot of people, the site directors will do swim waves; faster swimmers in the front, intermediate in the middle and new/slower swimmers in the back.
  • Stay calm and focused. If you feel yourself start to panic, flip on your back and do the back stroke or side stroke or call for a life guard to give you a noodle to float with. Calm yourself. Focus on your form and not the people around you. And repeat this over and over–I can do this.
  • Remember that the lifeguards are there to help–if you need help, raise your hand high and call for help. It is OK to ask for help when you need it. Your safety is the most important thing.
  • Have fun! Relax. Stay calm and realize this is practice.
We have many CNY Tri Club members participating in the Syracuse 70.3 on Sunday, June 21. GOOD LUCK to all our club athletes! To quote a line in the poem called “If” by Rudyard Kipling – “And so hold on when there is nothing in you. Except the Will which says to them: ‘Hold on!'” Kick asphalt, my friends!

 

Train hard, train safe!

Bridget Lichtinger
President
Next Board Meeting: Monday, July 13, 6 p.m., WTF

 

Kids Tri Club
The Kids Tri Club will meet once a week on Mondays at 6:30 p.m. starting July 6 at Jamesville Beach. The Kids Tri Club is geared toward children ages 7 to 13 and your child must know how to swim and be able to pass an open water swim test before being allowed to participate.
Kids are divided into three different categories depending on what they are most comfortable with: Mini, Sprint and Olympic distances. At the end of the season we will have an official Kids Triathlon Race in conjunction with the season-end CNY Tri Picnic at Jamesville Beach. The race is run just like the adults’–it has swim waves, t-shirts, race numbers, body marking, swim caps and a medal after crossing the finish line. Children need to bring their own swim cap, goggles, bike, helmet, running gear, transition towel and a water bottle for the training sessions.

 REGISTER TODAY!

Deadline to register is June 30

http://bit.ly/KidsTri2015

Coaches this season are Caryl Kinney, Christine Wilbur Brown, Denise Napoli and Renee Williams. Any questions about the program, contact Caryl Kinney at Carylk@twcny.rr.com

Children and parent(s) must be current members in order for the child or children to participate in the Kids Tri Club program. You can register under the family membership–see the membership page at http://cnytriathlon.org/membership/ to register. When registering for family membership please make sure to check the box on the Active.com registration form that you (as the person registering) are a member of the team…then add team members.

Open Water Swims
You MUST be a current member to participate and only 100 spots are available for each swim. Sign-ups will open a week prior to OWS date.
Green Lakes (sprint distance) – wetsuit REQUIRED
July 11, 2015
Twilight Swim – August 1, 2015
Jamesville Beach (1.2 or 2.4 miles) Endurance Swim. Participants MUST be able to swim the distance.
July 18, 2015

 

Tri PT by Troy

A new feature this month will bring training and injury prevention advice to Tri Club members. If you have any questions for Troy, please contact the editor at newsletter@cnytriathlon.org and I will pass them along.

Beware of Minimalist Shoes

Over the past two to three years I have had more and more athletes come into my office with lower leg and calf injuries. The majority of the injuries were caused by training in minimalist shoes or low heel drop shoes. Some switched to a different shoe and some didn’t know that they changed shoe type.

Now just to be clear….minimalist shoes and zero or low heel drop shoes are not bad, but they are not for everyone. Before I go any further let me give you two important definitions:

  • Minimalist Shoes. A Harvard University study states, “We define minimal footwear as any footwear that lacks high cushioned heels, stiff soles and arch support.”
  • Heel Drop is the downhill pitch from the heel cushion to the toe on the shoe. Traditional shoes usually have a 10-14 mm drop.  Minimalist shoes usually have a 0-4 mm drop (10 mm is a big difference to your body).
So if the shoe looks flat with a thin sole, you can twist or roll the shoe up with your hands like a burrito and there is no inner sole/arch support, you have a minimalist shoe.

It seems that it should be easy to spot a minimalist/low heel drop shoe, right? Yes and no. Many shoe companies are adapting shoes to have less heel drop, less cushion and less support. But they don’t always tell the consumer they are doing it. But your body will tell you the shoe changed. It’s not as noticeable as switching from high heels to bare feet, but the effects will be hard to ignore.

I had to switch brands of shoes because of lower leg pain. The support and heel drop changed in the model I wore for years, and I had no idea it changed. But a local running store did. This is where having a running store with trained staff that knows the changes made from shoe model year to year is invaluable.

Biomechanical studies show the more minimalist type of shoe promotes “proper running form” and there is less stress transmitted to the body on hard surfaces. Unfortunately, the studies and shoe companies forgot two important facts. One, since the 1970s the average Joe running shoes were constructed with a wedge heel cushion to absorb shock and the 1980s and 1990s big hair Nike air, cushy sneaker style added to the frenzy. This has promoted heel striking and improper running form in all of us for over 40 years. Two, the older we get the less our bodies can adapt to change. A quick change in shoes can lead to serious injury.

So if you did any running between 1970 and today, beware! Your body and running style may have adapted to the heel striking wedge cushion shoe. Throw in if you wear heels for work, have historically tight calves, or need arch support and now your legs are cookin’ with gas! Achilles tendonitis, Achilles rupture/tear, posterior compartment syndrome, calf tears and plantar fasciitis are just a few of the injuries I have seen from this shoe trend.

Choose your shoes wisely and if you have calf/lower leg issues, check with a running store specialist or physical therapist to make sure it isn’t the shoes.

 

Update: Cazenovia Triathlon

We are excited to be back for the 15th annual Cazenovia Triathlon. Some things to keep an eye out for in 2015 are the addition of the Rabin Law Firm CNY Championship Wave, a club/team incentive program, a legacy program, and the addition of an Intermediate Relay. These are all on top of the great race we have come to love.

If you are part of any triathlon club, we have a treat for you: We are starting a club/team incentive where all teams/clubs with five or more athletes will receive a tent space at the finish line and a gift bag full of locally made products. In addition, any team of 10 or more will receive their own rack space within transition so you can be with your friends and training partners.

We are also introducing a Legacy Program for athletes who have raced the Caz Tri seven or more times. This Legacy Program will have lots of incentives as well, such as a one-of-a-kind Caz Tri quarter zip long sleeve pullover.

Be sure to join us August 23 in Cazenovia for our 15th year; it promises to be a great one!

Registration is open.

The date has changed to August 23 to allow those racing Ironman Lake Placid and Iron Girl Syracuse plenty of time to rest and recover as well as helping extend the race season a bit further toward the fall.

Out 2015 goal is to make it all about the athletes and bring back what made us fall in love with about the sport of triathlon. We are bringing back the race t-shirts, offering finisher medals for all of those who cross that finish line, and so much more. We have also changed our registration service to cut the cost on processing fees.

2015 also offers an exciting new race with the Intermediate Relay. Just like the sprint relay, athletes can race the intermediate distance in two- or three-person teams.

CazenoviaTriathlon.org 

or

facebook.com/CazenoviaTriathlon

Registration can be found at:

 

Good luck with your upcoming training and we hope to see you in August.

Ask the Coach
I hope you are enjoying our new feature, Ask the Coach. Mem  bers are urged to submit questions to newsletter@cnytriclub.org. The editor will then forward the question to that month’s coach. I hope this feature will provide valuable information as well as help you get to know the triathlon resources available in our area. This month’s coaches are Jennifer and Michael Corona.
Road Bike or Tri Bike:
What Makes Sense for You?

As coaches, we strive to guide our athletes through all aspects of triathlon. As Age Group
athletes, most come to us to get the most performance out of their time; few are looking to win and most have full-time jobs, children and other activi

ties. In addition to making the schedule work, and optimizing fitness for a key race, guiding athletes through equipment choices is also extremely important.  One of the first decisions a new triathlete will make is, “Road bike or Tri bike?”

In this article, we will outline the pros and cons of each, and explain why it may make sense to use both in your training.

The Road Bike
Pros

 

  • Much more comfortable
  • Handling is not as difficult and is much safer
  • Group riding is much safer
  • Owning a road bike allows you to road race in addition to racing triathlon
  • If riders are unable to maintain aero position on a tri bike, a road bike provides much better positioning for training and racing. Far too often we see people training/racing on tri bikes out of the aero position. Riding like this on a tri bike is extremely uncomfortable and increases wind resistance. An athlete would be much better off (faster) on a properly fitted road bike.

Cons

  • Assuming proper position set-up, and staying in the aero position, a tri bike is much faster and comfortable. While adding clip-ons to a road bike allows the rider to be more aero, they are stretched out and it is not nearly as comfortable as being on aero bars with a tri bike.
  • The geometry of a road bike is not as ideal for running off the bike.
The Tri Bike

Pros

  • The tri bike is designed to allow the athlete to be much lower, and thus, more aero, which reduces wind resistance.
  •  Aero position is much more comfortable on a tri bike.
  • The geometry favors running off the bike.

Why use both?

For more advanced athletes and those that can afford two bikes, it makes a lot of sense to have both. Riding a tri bike year-round may not be as enjoyable as having a road bike to mix it up. Also, owning a road bike makes group riding a lot more fun, and exposing yourself to better riders will force you to ride harder. In addition, your bike handling skills will become more developed within a group riding environment, which is easier and safer on a road bike.

For our advanced Ironman athletes, we will sometimes shift their long run to mid-week, and have them do a double long ride on the weekend. One of those rides is very session focused with intervals so we suggest the tri bike. The other ride is what we refer to as an “open ride.” This ride is at the athlete’s discretion, based on how they feel, and we often encourage an athlete to use his or her road bike. The road bike works other muscle groups in a proper sitting up position, and more importantly, most athletes enjoy the time on their road bike. Our advanced Ironman athletes are sometimes riding 12 hours per week. Spending three of those hours on their road bike is a great mental break!

 

Corona Multisport

Mike Corona, USAT Level I Certified Coach, began coaching triathlon locally in 2010 and has been a Youth Sports coach with the YMCA for the past five years. Mike came into the sport of triathlon in 2008, having no athletic background and coming off a 260 pound frame, losing 90 pounds through the sport. He diligently studied training principles, taught himself how to swim and bought his first road bike in December 2008. He coached himself, leading to his first race in June 2009, the Keuka Lake Sprint Triathlon, where he won his age group and placed 10th overall out of over 300 participants. Since that time, Mike has spent countless hours learning from several coaches, and has applied everything he has learned to help others achieve their goals within the sport. He believes in bringing out the best in each individual and working with people to do whatever it takes to reach their goals.
Jen Corona, USAT Level I Coach, has been training in the sport since 2008 and coaching
since 2012. She enjoys sharing triathlon knowledge with all types of athletes, but especially loves working with athletes that are tackling their first half or full Ironman. She also knows first-hand the challenge of balancing kids, career and triathlon.

Member Profile
 Jim Bright

Jim Bright heads to T1 after the swim at Nationals in Milwaukee.

 

Tell us about yourself. I grew up in Syracuse, moved away for college, job, etc., worked in finance in New York City, married my college sweetheart (Cindy, a pediatrician), moved back here when we were about 30 and purchased the family business (Dunk & Bright Furniture Co.), which I still run. Raised four kids on Onondaga Hill, and moved to Skaneateles about five years ago.

How long have you been involved in triathlon and

Jim and Cindy Bright at the Delta Lake Triathlon.

why did you take it up? About 10 years ago I was swimming with a masters swim team, biking with friends and running with the Syracuse Track Club at Green Lakes. Somebody suggested triathlons.

Who is your hero? Definitely my kids right now. They are each on the cusp of their career paths, and their work ethic, focus and persistence are inspiring.

What is your athletic background? Team sports, primarily lacrosse that included a short stint in college. Some golf, tennis.

What are your triathlon strengths and
weaknesses?
I’m probably average at all three. I truly enjoy each leg of the race. I do mostly sprints and train as such, doing interval training, short and spirited workouts, plenty of rest and recovery.

What was your first triathlon and what do you remember most? Green Lakes…this was before CNY Triathlon helped racers prepare. I showed up about 15 minutes before the start of the race, really not having a clue. I do remember that a friend beat me by about 14 minutes. I can still remember his smirk.

What is your favorite race and why? London, age group world championships, because there were plenty of competitors in my age group, of similar or maybe slightly faster speed, to pace off of in the run. That kept me focused and helped me PR for the run.

What was your worst race and why? Oswego Sprint Tri, because I came in second overall, missing first by 4 seconds. I had missed a turn, which could have accounted for the difference. The lesson was to “make sure that you know the course.” Actually, it was a really great race, at a great venue, and I was happy to get second.

What races are on your race calendar for 2015?

I don’t have any on the calendar right now. Since Cindy now races triathlons, we decide what to race based on our travel plans, and we like to try new venues. We did that last year and ended up racing a couple of ocean swims…one in Virginia Beach organized by the Navy Seals. That was a blast. My swim performance consisted of swimming 10 meters forward, then getting tossed five meters back. I didn’t get out far enough beyond the wave break, and kept getting flipped upside-down by the waves.
The Brights take a five-borough bike tour of New York City.

What are this year’s goals? To work on some other new hobbies besides triathlon, and continue to do tri training for fitness, but not necessarily racing.

In five years you hope to … Hmmm…well, in three years, I’ll be in the first year of the next age group, so I’d like to hit it hard again at that time.

Something most people don’t know about you. I once spent 18 days living

in a tent hunting moose and bear in Siberia.

What triathlon has taught you. It’s definitely taught me to make healthy lifestyle choices with both nutrition and fitness, and the competitive aspect of it is just wonderful.

CNY Triathlon Club | Box 434 | Dewitt | NY | 13214

May 2015 : issue 74

Wednesday, May 6th, 2015

CNY Triangle Logo
CNY TRI CLUB
Newsletter
May 2015
From the President
Dear Members,

 

Weeknight Training season is fast approaching so I wanted to take a moment to go over a few housekeeping items:

 

It has been suggested over the past few years to have training on different nights as a way to help attract more volunteers. The idea is if a member can train on one night, they can volunteer for the next night. We are testing it out this season. Jamesville has changed to Tuesday nights (starting May 19). Gillie Lake (starting May 20) and Oneida Shores (starting May 20) will stay on Wednesday nights because these are the most heavily populated sites and we need to split up the members so not to overrun one.

 

  • You must be a current member to participate in Weeknight Training.
  • Weeknight Training starts promptly at 6 p.m. (sign-in starts at 5:15 p.m.)
  • Weeknight Training sites must be fully staffed with volunteers. If there are not enough volunteers the practice will be cancelled.
  • WEATHER CANCELLATION POLICY: If a site is going to cancel before 4 p.m. due to bad weather, we will send out an email and post an announcement on the club’s Facebook page and Google group. If we have to cancel AFTER 4 p.m. it will be an on-site decision. Only the following people will announce a cancellation–if it doesn’t come from any of these individuals, it is a rumor–Tom Stern, Sam Sampere, Ken Geary, Lari Jimerson, Mike Gasparek, Eric Prager and Bridget Lichtinger.
  • Please review the rules and course for each site prior to the opening of Weeknight Training.  All information can be found on the club’s website underClub Training.
  • VOLUNTEER! Our club is organized and run by a volunteers (myself and the other board members included). The club programs are only sustainable if members pull together to volunteer at least once during the season. Take a moment to look at the volunteer spreadsheet and sign up in advance to volunteer for ONE night this season.

Train safe! Train hard!

 

Bridget Lichtinger
President

 

Next Board Meeting: Monday, May 11, 6 p.m., WTF
Open Water Swims
You MUST be a current member to participate and only 100 spots are available for each swim. Sign-ups will open a week prior to OWS date.

 

Green Lakes (sprint distance) – wetsuit REQUIRED
June 7, 2015
July 11, 2015
Twilight Swim – August 1, 2015

 

Jamesville Beach (1.2 or 2.4 miles) Endurance Swim. Participants MUST be able to swim the distance.
July 18, 2015

 

Are you interested in getting intimately involved in the Ironman experience but not ready to race? Here is an AWESOME way to both learn and help: become an escort for the Ironman pros. That’s right, your “volunteer” spot can be riding your bike just ahead of the top pro men and women during the run portion of Syracuse 70.3. Interested in details? Contact Ben Rabin, lead organizer for these volunteer spots, at:bikehelp@me.com.
Tri PT by Troy

A new feature this month will bring training and injury prevention advice to Tri Club members. If you have any questions for Troy, please contact the editor at newsletter@cnytriathlon.org and I will pass them along.

 

Hi everyone! I’m Troy Andrews, a Physical Therapist that specializes in Sports Rehab, Corrective Exercise and Sports Performance. I will be contributing to the CNY TRI Club newsletter giving insight, professional advice and insider information on topics involving training, injury prevention and injury rehab. I work at Mary Lou Corcoran Physical Therapy in Fayetteville.

 

Some of you may have already seen me as patients or at sports performance sessions. And if you’re on Facebook you know my wife, Meredith, is my biggest fan. I have been working with athletes in some way, shape or form for over 30 years. During my experiences working with athletes at all levels of competition, I found key areas that are ignored or do not get addressed properly at all levels of competition. This left many athletes injury prone, frustrated and never able to reach their true athletic potential.

 

I want to share this knowledge with you and help you reach your true potential. Yeah, it sounds like an infomercial, but bear with me: I have some really great information to share with you. I have been told I have a unique approach and philosophy when addressing and understanding athletes and their issues. My ideas are simple but effective and focus on helping the athlete address the neuromuscular connection between their body and sports.

 

My first topic is “How should I warm up?”

 

I am always asked this question. Many say light cardio and dynamic stretching. Some go old school and do static stretching or calisthenics. Most of the patients and clients I see don’t do anything or just do stuff they learned somewhere because you’re supposed to do something, right? By warming up I will prevent injury and perform better, right?

Well my answer is …. YES! You are supposed to warm up, but the type of warmup depends on the athlete’s body and the sport/activity to be performed. The athlete should first identify the major joints, muscles and movement patterns that are used during the sport they are about to perform, then identify the limitations or issues his or her body may have in these areas.

The warmup can be very specific and may be short in duration, but should prepare you for proper form and movement involved in the activity. Not identifying your body’s tendencies can lead to poor performance, injury and chronic issues.

When you are at a race you will always see the elite athletes doing various warmup exercises, at different speeds and for different lengths of time. Why don’t they all do the same thing to warm up? They’re all doing the same event. It’s because they know what to address to make their body be ready to perform at its best for that event.

 

There is a reason to warm up differently for each different event. But what if you are doing a triathlon or strength training? Helping you identify your body’s tendencies, how it affects training/performance and getting a proper warmup are topics I will address in future columns.

 

Update: Cazenovia Triathlon

We are excited to be back for the 15th annual Cazenovia Triathlon. Some things to keep an eye out for in 2015 are the addition of the Rabin Law Firm CNY Championship Wave, a club/team incentive program, a legacy program, and the addition of an Intermediate Relay. These are all on top of the great race we have come to love.

 

If you are part of any triathlon club, we have a treat for you: We are starting a club/team incentive where all teams/clubs with five or more athletes will receive a tent space at the finish line and a gift bag full of locally made products. In addition, any team of 10 or more will receive their own rack space within transition so you can be with your friends and training partners.

 

We are also introducing a Legacy Program for athletes who have raced the Caz Tri seven or more times. This Legacy Program will have lots of incentives as well, such as a one-of-a-kind Caz Tri quarter zip long sleeve pullover.

 

Be sure to join us August 23 in Cazenovia for our 15th year; it promises to be a great one!

 

Registration is open.

 

The date has changed to August 23 to allow those racing Ironman Lake Placid and Iron Girl Syracuse plenty of time to rest and recover as well as helping extend the race season a bit further toward the fall.

 

Out 2015 goal is to make it all about the athletes and bring back what made us fall in love with about the sport of triathlon. We are bringing back the race t-shirts, offering finisher medals for all of those who cross that finish line, and so much more. We have also changed our registration service to cut the cost on processing fees.

 

2015 also offers an exciting new race with the Intermediate Relay. Just like the sprint relay, athletes can race the intermediate distance in two- or three-person teams.

 

CazenoviaTriathlon.org 

or

facebook.com/CazenoviaTriathlon

 

Registration can be found at:

 

Good luck with your upcoming training and we hope to see you in August.

 

Onondaga Cycling Club Syracuse 70.3 Ride
Saturday, May 30
Ride of the Syracuse 70.3 course and enjoy a picnic afterwards. To register for the event and get additional details, go to trireg.com/occ-ironman-703-warmup. Although it says that it is an Ironman warmup, this is not a race.
There is a 22-mile option, not to mention a bunch of our rides go by here, so make up one of your own. There will be ice cream at the DeRuyter General store, which is at the halfway mark for those of you doing the 70.3 option. Also, there will be food and fun back at the park. Here is link to the map for the ride:
onondagacyclingclub.org/maps/pdf/JamRes1-fondo-loop.pdf 

Feeling lucky? OCC will be holding a few raffles with prizes from local bike shops. So don’t miss the fun all for only $20. Register today to avoid the $10 day-of late fee.
Ask the Coach

I hope you are enjoying our new feature, Ask the Coach. Members are urged to submit questions to newsletter@ cnytriclub.org. The editor will then forward the question to that month’s coach. I hope this feature will provide valuable information as well as help you get to know the triathlon resources available in our area. This month’s coach is Kristen Roe.
I have completed seven 7.03s, and think it’s time to take the leap to a full Ironman. What do I need to think about?
First I have to say that I chuckled with the question because most athletes who come to me for Ironman coaching have either: never done a triathlon, or have done one or two sprints and now want to do an Ironman. So if someone came to me and said this, I would hug them and say thank you for doing it the right way.
With that said, if you want to do an Ironman:
Step #1. Take a look at how many triathlons you have completed. Have you done all distances? Do a 70.3 first and see how you like it and iaf you n fit in the training. Ironman is no joke, the time needed to dedicate to training is a lot!
Step #2. Take a look at your calendar a year out from when you want to do your IM. Are there business trips, vacations, weddings, family commitments that will not allow you proper time to train? Most Ironman athletes will need upwards of 12 to 15 hours a week at least to train. Long rides and runs could take up your weekends anywhere from three to seven-plus hours. If you don’t have the time to commit and your family is not on board with it, then maybe you should save it for another time. If you do have the time then proceed to step #3.
 
Step #3. HIRE A COACH!!!!! This would be the smartest thing you could ever do. Worth every penny. It takes any guesswork out of what you should be doing and when! Having someone else think and plan for you takes away a lot of stress. You can ask as many questions as you’d like and get a straight answer from someone who understands you and knows your training plan vs. having to Google it and get a million different answers. I happen to know a very good coach specializing in Ironman distance!
Step #4. Pick an Ironman course that you think will suit your strengths and weaknesses. I know that a lot of people jump into Ironman Lake Placid because it’s so close and so many people from the area do it, so it feels like a local race. In my opinion, Lake Placid is the granddaddy of them all (besides Kona). It is magical there, but if you’re not a good climber, maybe it’s not the one for you. Your coach will have a good idea of race venues and can help you choose one that is right for you. You want this to be a positive experience, right?
Step #5. Remember, we do this for fun and for a challenge. We are all something else besides triathletes. Don’t lose sight of that. We all know the life of a triathlete can be all consuming. The life of an IRONMAN triathlete is 10x that!
Step #6. When you do cross that Ironman finish line hold your hands up high and smile! That picture will one of your most prized possessions!
I have been doing triathlon for 20 years, coaching for 9-10 years. I have done 14 Ironman distance races including Kona twice (I qualified a third time but broke my hip on a training ride and couldn’t compete), a boatload of 70.3 distance including World Championships for 70.3 as well as a bunch of sprint and olympic distance tris. Two highlights were winning my age group at Ironman Florida in just over 10 hours and winning Chesapeake Man Iron Distance race. I have two kids, two dogs and a husband that keep me super busy along with co-owning T2 Multisport and race director for Du The Lakes Duathlon. I love love love the life of triathlon as it has opened many doors and has taken me on many adventures. I have a BS in Sport Fitness and Leisure Studies as well as a master’s in teaching. I worked for 12 years as an athletic trainer at two different universities before getting into personal training and then multisport coaching. I can be reached at Kristen@T2Multisport.com.
MEMBER PROFILE
Due to circumstances beyond the editor’s control, there is no Athlete Profile this month. If any reader cares to volunteer his/herself for the June profile, please contact me at newsletter@cnytriathlon.org.
Discount for Tri Club Members

HITS Endurance is offering club members a 50% discount on registration to two of its summertime events, HITS North Country and HITS Kingston.

Located in Hague, HITS North Country is tucked away in the rugged Adirondacks, making it a perfect location for all Northeast area athletes. HITS North Country will be the set-ting for a breathtaking race unlike any other, beginning in scenic Hague and encompassing several local communities. Featuring one of the greatest open water swims in stunning Lake George, HITS North Country is a race to remember. Race weekend is June 27-28. Register here: http://hitstriathlonseries.com/hague-ny/

 

On July 11-12, head downstate for the inaugural HITS Kingston Triathlon.

Experience the splendor and beauty of the Hudson River, Ashokan Reservoir and Rondout Waterfront. You’ll be welcomed by warm weather, HITS’ knowledgeable tri staff and fellow athletes. Register here:  http://hitstriathlonseries.com/kingston-ny/

As an added challenge, all competitors who beat HITS race director Mark H. Wilson in the full distance race win a FREE entry to the full at HITS Kingston 2016.

 

Now for the best part: Members of the CNY Triathlon club will enjoy a 50% discount off of the base/full price for sprint, olympic, half and fll distances by using the codeCNYSAVES. The code will be good up to 30 days out from each event.

CNY Triathlon Club | Box 434 | Dewitt | NY | 13214

April 2015 : issue 73

Tuesday, April 7th, 2015

CNY Triangle Logo
CNY TRI CLUB
Newsletter
April 2015
From the President

Dear Members,

We closed another season at the WTF (Winter Training Facility) with a bang, holding the Inaugural Spring Fling. The event was held in collaboration with the Onondaga Cycling Club to bring both clubs’ members together to have a little fun and kick-start the summer season (if summer ever gets here). I want to thank my partners at OCC and all the volunteers that helped make this event a huge success.

We also couldn’t have done it without the wonderful support of our local vendors that came out to the WTF: Bike Loft East, Bike Loft North, Healing Point Chiropractic and Acupuncture, InStride Sports, Rescue Mission, Saunacuse, Tranquility Massage, and Metta Massage. Also, thanks to Fleet Feet coaches for coming out and to Syracuse Bicycle for donating a $300 bike fit. And I can’t leave out our speakers: Sam Sampere, Ben Rabin, Kelly Covert and Adam Ruszkowski.

At the Spring Fling, I was asked a lot about the future of the WTF since the management at Shoppingtown Mall has sent in a proposal to tear down the Sears wing. As far as we know, we should be OK for another year in our current location. So, the WTF should be around for another season. YAY!

Bridget

President

CNY Triathlon Club

Next Board Meeting: Monday, April 13, 6 p.m., WTF

 

Trashman 2015

On Saturday, April 25, we will hold our annual Trashman event at Jamesville Beach.

The Trashman is our club’s annual effort as part of the Onondaga County Adopt-a- Roadway program. We donate about an hour of our time to pick up the trash that has accumulated along Apulia Road in Jamesville. As usual, the trash picking will be followed by some serious pedaling (optional).

Perhaps this will be your first opportunity to ride the Syracuse 70.3 bike course this year (Or your first time ever. Yikes! You will have company!). Or do a shorter, early season-friendly route of your choice, or run the 70.3 run course.

We’d like to do a good job of sprucing up Apulia Road as a way of thanking residents of the area for their patience with us during our Weeknight Trainings every summer, and, at the same time, clean up the beginning and end of the Syracuse 70.3 race bike and run course, too.

For more information, see http://cnytriathlon.org/volunteer/trashman-the/, or email Tom Stern, sbr19tri@yahoo.com. I hope to see many of you on April 25.

Check our Facebook page or Google group email for a start time about a week before the event.

Update: Cazenovia Triathlon

We are excited to be back for the 15th annual Cazenovia Triathlon. Some things to keep an eye out for in 2015 are the addition of the Rabin Law Firm CNY Championship Wave, a club/team incentive program, a legacy program, and the addition of an Intermediate Relay. These are all on top of the great race we have come to love.

If you are part of any triathlon club, we have a treat for you: We are starting a club/team incentive where all teams/clubs with five or more athletes will receive a tent space at the finish line and a gift bag full of locally made products. In addition, any team of 10 or more will receive their own rack space within transition so you can be with your friends and training partners.

We are also introducing a Legacy Program for athletes who have raced the Caz Tri seven or more times. This Legacy Program will have lots of incentives as well, such as a one-of-a-kind Caz Tri quarter zip long sleeve pullover.

Be sure to join us August 23 in Cazenovia for our 15th year; it promises to be a great one!

Registration is open.

The date has changed to August 23 to allow those racing Ironman Lake Placid and Iron Girl Syracuse plenty of time to rest and recover as well as helping extend the race season a bit further toward the fall.

Out 2015 goal is to make it all about the athletes and bring back what made us fall in love with about the sport of triathlon. We are bringing back the race t-shirts, offering finisher medals for all of those who cross that finish line, and so much more. We have also changed our registration service to cut the cost on processing fees.

2015 also offers an exciting new race with the Intermediate Relay. Just like the sprint relay, athletes can race the intermediate distance in two- or three-person teams.

CazenoviaTriathlon.org 

or

facebook.com/CazenoviaTriathlon

Registration can be found at:

 

Good luck with your upcoming training and we hope to see you in August.

Holistic Health Workshop
Dr. Sungwon D. Yoo is a New York State-licensed chiropractor and acupuncturist who specializes in spinal reconstruction combined with acupuncture. He combines both Western and Eastern holistic practices in one convenient location, Healing Point Chiropractic & Acupuncture in Fayetteville. This workshop will focus on a highly advanced, scientific and proven chiropractic technique which corrects and restores your spine back to alignment, called Chiropractics BioPhysics (CBP). Unlike regular chiropractic that mainly focuses on immediate pain relief, CBP goes one step further to also correct the source of the problem.

 

 

Please feel welcome to join us, along with guests, on Saturday, May 2, from 10 a.m. to noon at the WTF in Shoppingtown Mall. Register at: http://conta.cc/1OQkgh4
Ask the Coach

I hope you are enjoying our new feature, Ask the Coach. Members are urged to submit questions to newsletter@ cnytriclub.org. The editor will then forward the question to that month’s coach. I hope this feature will provide valuable information as well as help you get to know the triathlon resources available in our area. This month’s coach is Ed Ten Eyck.
I have read that nutrition is the fourth discipline of triathlon. What do you tell your athletes about proper eating habits? Do you believe in any sort of specialized diet–Paleo, clean eating? 
Nutrition is the fourth discipline because, with all the training in the world, if your diet is off then you can miss out on your goal time, DNF or worse. I am a believer in not dieting but following a natural food/minimally processed lifestyle. A lot of the “diets” out there are geared toward short-term modifications to macronutrient intake to achieve a look or weight.

 

At the same time, tell me about nutrition/fueling for race day. What sorts of foods do you suggest athletes eat during the course of the race? 

 

Race day fueling will vary from athlete to athlete and will be based on the length of the event. Someone who is doing a sprint or Olympic distance doesn’t need a five-day carb load plan. For race day there are no changes made in “practice” scenarios. I will have my athletes do practice meal plans and race day nutrition to see how the body responds. Generally speaking most athletes will be consuming a combination of solids, gels and liquid calories and electrolytes during the event. All foods consumed during the race will be low fiber and easy to digest. I am a fan of Infinit nutrition because you can have your formula. Solid food is very tough for some athletes based on how hard they are pushing themselves. That’s where Gu or Powerbar gels work great.

What sort of supplements, if any, do you recommend for your athletes? Why do you recommend what you do?

I only suggest electrolytes because part of racing is making sure you are replenishing your lost electrolytes.
Ed Ten Eyck is part owner of T2Multisport and has been racing duathlon as part of Team USA for the last 3 years. He has a BS in exercise science from SUNY Cortland and is a personal trainer at Gold’s Gym in DeWitt.

 

MEMBER PROFILE

Jeffrey Heim

 

Tell us about yourself. I am currently working as a traffic signal technician for the City of Syracuse. I am orginally from the Buffalo suburb Cheektowaga (aka cheektovegas). I moved to Syracuse in 2001 after I got out of the Navy in which I was enlisted as an Aviation Electronics Technician.

How long have you been involved in triathlon and what made you take it up? I started triathlon four years ago. I have always weight trained and I wanted a change and a new fitness challenge.

 

Who is your hero? I have no one hero. Heroes walk among us every day. When you meet them and hear their story you just know they are.

 

What is your athletic background? Many years of weight lifting but I didn’t play sports in school. I’m making up for it now…lol.

What are your triathlon strengths and weaknesses? That’s hard to say. Each race has brought me a new challenge. I used to think my swimming was my strongest at first but my bike suffered so I focused more on bike last season but then my swim times suffered……it’s a delicate balance.

What was your first triathlon and what do you remember most? Green Lakes 2012…..I trained really hard for it. I remember getting freaked out during the wrestling match also known as the swim but I got on my back and calmed myself down for a few seconds then I was fine.

What is your favorite race and why? So far Delta Lake ……..simple……there is beer at the end!!

 

What was your worst race and why? Cazenovia 2012. I pulled my calf taking my wetsuit off, I was not ready for the hills on the bike course and my injured calf locked up during the run. I was glad I only did the sprint.

What races are on your race calendar for 2015? I did the Syracuse Half Marathon already and am doing the Springtime 10k, Mountain Goat, Charity for Children 8K Green Lkes Tri, Syracuse 70.3 and either Delta Lake or Mussleman……… more TBD.

What are this year’s goals? Syracuse 70.3 in under six hours. Last year was 6:08

In five years you hope to … Be healthy, injury free and still training hard

Something most people don’t know about you. I used to smoke and had asthma.

   

What triathlon has taught you. Patience. When I first heard of triathlon and the distances I was totally intimidated. I have learned that through hard work and patience, distance is just a matter of time.

 

Discount for Tri Club Members

HITS Endurance is offering club members a 50% discount on registration to two of its summertime events, HITS North Country and HITS Kingston.

Located in Hague, HITS North Country is tucked away in the rugged Adirondacks, making it a perfect location for all Northeast area athletes. HITS North Country will be the set-ting for a breathtaking race unlike any other, beginning in scenic Hague and encompassing several local communities. Featuring one of the greatest open water swims in stunning Lake George, HITS North Country is a race to remember. Race weekend is June 27-28. Register here: http://hitstriathlonseries.com/hague-ny/

On July 11-12, head downstate for the inaugural HITS Kingston Triathlon.

Experience the splendor and beauty of the Hudson River, Ashokan Reservoir and Rondout Waterfront. You’ll be welcomed by warm weather, HITS’ knowledgeable tri staff and fellow athletes. Register here:  http://hitstriathlonseries.com/kingston-ny/

 

As an added challenge, all competitors who beat HITS race director Mark H. Wilson in the full distance race win a FREE entry to the full at HITS Kingston 2016.

Now for the best part: Members of the CNY Triathlon club will enjoy a 50% discount off of the base/full price for sprint, olympic, half and fll distances by using the code CNYSAVES. The code will be good up to 30 days out from each event.

 

CNY Triathlon Club | Box 434 | Dewitt | NY | 13214

 

 

March 2015 : issue 72

Wednesday, March 4th, 2015
CNY Triangle Logo
CNY TRI CLUB
Newsletter
March 2015
From the President

Dear Members,

We have a very exciting event on Sunday, March 29, and I hope you join us.

The CNY Tri Club and Onondaga Cycling Club would like to invite you to the Spring Fling at the Winter Training Facility (WTF) located in Shoppingtown Mall.

The goal of the Spring Fling can be summed up in one word: COMMUNITY. Getting together to have some food, beverages and fun to kick start the season.

Here is what we have planned: 

  • Inaugural Time Trial Wars!
  • Members will go head-to-head in a 20-minute TT for badass bragging rights. TT Wars will begin at 8 a.m. and the awards ceremony will be at 4 p.m. Who will win the war? Come out to find out and to cheer (or heckle) members as they compete.
  • Educational seminars. Starting at 9 a.m. we will have a series of learning opportunities that we hope you find very helpful (see Spring Fling info below).
  • Food, beer, wine, soda and friends. Come out and have some food and drinks on us. Mix and mingle with fellow club members. Meet the great local vendors who will be there to answer your questions. Some even have some awesome goodies they will be handing out.

We really hope you will join us. Because we are all in this together.

Bridget
President

CNY Triathlon Club

Next Board Meeting: Sunday, March 8, 6 p.m., WTF

 

SPRING FLING
  Sunday, March 29

CNY Tri Club Winter Training Facility – Shoppingtown Mall


TIME TRIAL WARS

 

JOIN IN THE FUN! EVENT IS FREE AND YOU GET A COOL T-SHIRT!

 

DEADLINE TO REGISTER IS MARCH 16

REGISTER TODAY:

 


TEAM Registration link: http://conta.cc/1FoBMWv

INDIVIDUAL Registration link: http://conta.cc/1vTmPJ2

 

 

CNY Tri and Onondaga Cycling Club will each have teams; there is an individual category as well. Participants will have 15 minutes to warm up on the Computrainers and then the war begins: 20 minutes ALL OUT! Don’t worry it will be flat! And drafting will be on for the teams!

 


Awards and bragging rights will be at 4 p.m. with plenty of beer and wine. Who will be crowned the winner and earn bragging rights for 2015?

8 a.m. – Teams

9 – Individuals

10 a.m. – Teams

11 a.m. – Individuals

1 p.m. – Teams

2 p.m. – Individuals

3 p.m. – Teams

(Heat times assigned after registration)


EDUCATIONAL SEMINARS

 

DEADLINE TO REGISTER IS MARCH 23

 


REGISTER TODAY: http://conta.cc/1BHR1rj

9  a.m. – Road Etiquette/OCC Programs


Ever wonder why we bike with traffic and not against? Or you want to ride with a group, but aren’t sure what to do? Mike Lyon and Todd Relyea from OCC will cover all the basics and tell you about the great rides OCC has to offer.


10 a.m. – Protect Yourself & Your Bike! Bike Laws


As a cyclist you have rights. Do you know what they are? However, as a cyclist you could be liable. Do you know why? Ben Rabin the Bike Lawyer will explain how to protect yourself and make sure you are covered.


11 a.m. – Bike Handling Skills 101


Do you break out in a sweat when you are approaching a sharp turn? What about going downhill? Sam Sampere, USAT certified Triathlon Coach, will cover all the basics with you so you will feel more confident on the road.


BRING YOUR BIKE to practice!


Noon – When & Why to Hire a Coach?


You feel you are ready to make the jump to an endurance triathlon, but are wondering if you should hire a coach. Maybe you are looking to improve your current performance. When do you decide it is time for a coach? Kelly Covert, Co-founder and Coach


of Strong Body, Whole Heart, will talk about when to think about a coach and why.


1 p.m. – Introduction to Triathlon


You are thinking of signing up for a triathlon or this is your first one. Maybe you have done one, but still have some questions. How do you prepare? Jennifer Hughes,


YMCA Triathlon Director, will give you an overview of the wonderful world of triathlon and get you on the track for a great season.



POTLUCK


We need volunteers for the potluck. Please help :-)

Interested? Email Tamara at volunteer@cnytriathlon.org by March 23.

 


VENDOR PARTICIPANTS

 

Come meet and talk with the local vendors that help CNY Triathlon Club members meet their goals.

 

  • Kathy MacDowell, LMT Tranquility Therapeutic Massage
  • Kim Fischer, Lotus Life Yoga Center. Kim is offering 10% off all yoga class packages during the week of March 23.   www.lotuslifeyogacenter.com 
  • Jeremy Clay, Bike Loft East. Jeremy is will be offering Bike Loft East Tune Up Coupons, good for $25 off a standard tune-up and $35 off a super tune-up at Bike Loft East, 119 W. Seneca St., Manlius. www.bikeloft.com

 

Important Notice: Ignore at Your Own Peril

The Winter Training Facility is closing soon. 

The WTF will be closing for the season on Sunday, March 29. If you have a bike at the WTF then you must pick it up before that date.  After that date we cannot guarantee to have a volunteer meet you to get your bike. If we still have your bike at the WTF after April 1, then we thank you for your donation! :-)

Ask the Coach

I hope you are enjoying our new feature, Ask the Coach. Members are urged to submit questions to newsletter@cnytriclub.org. The editor will then forward the question to that month’s coach. I hope this feature will provide valuable information as well as help you get to know the triathlon resources available in our area. This month’s coach is Laura Henry.

We all know this has been a brutal winter, so bad that outdoor running on some days has been impossible, and very few of us have gotten outside on our bikes. What do you tell triathletes as we enter March (and the hope of warmer weather), and they perhaps overdo it they’re so excited for the conditions?

I can certainly relate to being excited for non-brutal outdoor training conditions! My first outdoor road ride of the season is always worthy of a social media post. 😉 I advise athletes to keep the bigger picture in mind, which includes their long-term goals for the season (and perhaps beyond). Overdoing it right now might not seem like a big deal, but it can have a lasting ripple effect if they end up with an overuse injury. No one wants to miss their goal event due to injury. If they do realize that they may have overdone it after a workout or two in better conditions, I advise them to scale back their upcoming workouts (in both duration and intensity). Or, if an injury is a concern, to take a rest day or two in order to try and nip it in the bud early on versus pushing through and possibly further aggravating any injury that may be brewing and could force them to need to take more time off.

Speaking of winter, what sort of coaching goes on in the colder months?

Generally speaking, for athletes whose goal events are in the main triathlon season, I use wintertime to help athletes develop a solid base for the upcoming season, no matter what distance or level athlete they may be. I also work with the athlete during this time to develop a solid annual training plan so that we’re both on the same page about what the road map to his/her goals looks like. I incorporate more functional strength training into my athletes’ plans during the winter months to help them correct imbalances that triathletes are prone to (weak hips, etc.); since they aren’t peaking for a race, they have more training hours that can be allocated for those types of workouts. Since athletes in our home region are confined to mostly indoor training during the winter months, it is a good opportunity to work on swim drills and skills in the pool to help reduce drag in the water, help improve form, and therefore help the athlete get faster on the swim during race season. Bike trainer workouts provide an opportunity for drills that cannot be completed in road riding (i.e. single leg drills) and controlled, focused efforts that have a strong and lasting training benefit since trainer rides are not susceptible to factors such as weather, road conditions and coasting. Even the dreaded treadmill can be a very useful tool during this time when paired with specific workouts that can make speed work a safe option when the roads and tracks outside are too slick to do speed work safely. Although our climate does keep many people inside during the winter months, this time of year does provide athletes with opportunities to incorporate other forms of fitness that take place outdoors into their training regimens if they choose to do so, such as cross-country skiing, snow shoeing and fat biking. This adds variety, keeps athletes from getting too much cabin fever, and breaks up the monotony of the same swim, bike and run workouts that are completed when it’s warm. I personally use outdoor fat bike rides as my long endurance cycling rides and snow shoe running on outdoor trails as my aerobic interval workouts during the winter. If my athletes have the desire and the gear to complete these types of workouts, I incorporate them into their plans. Finally, if an athlete has a nagging injury from the previous season, I work with them to heal and get stronger safely so that they have an opportunity to work toward new goals once winter is over.

You are fairly new to the coaching profession. Why did you decide to pursue it?

My longtime coach, Karen Allen-Turner, helped me (and is still helping me) develop into the best athlete I can be and helped me reach goals I never even knew I had for myself. It lit a spark in me and I became a healthier, more well-rounded, more social and more fit person because of the lifestyle changes that accompanied my participation in the sport. In 2012 I started volunteering with Team Red, White & Blue (Team RWB), a non-profit veteran support organization whose mission is to enrich the lives of America’s veterans through physical fitness and social activity. I took on a volunteer leadership role within my local chapter (Team RWB Syracuse) and have had the honor to work with a diverse group of athletes, comprising both veterans and civilians, over the last three years. I had just ended a toxic relationship that had destroyed me in many ways when I joined Team RWB, and the people in this group helped me heal and become myself again in countless ways. Both Karen and Team RWB inspired me to want to help others reach their goals as much as they helped me. Since triathlon has become a passion of mine, I felt it most appropriate to pursue coaching in this discipline. I started coaching athletes in 2013, and completed my USA Triathlon Level I certification in 2014 while being mentored by Karen. I came on board with The Right Fit MultiSports this season as a coach, and I am currently working toward completing a couple more certifications this year so I can better serve and assist my athletes; there’s always something new to learn, no matter how long I’ve been in the sport as an athlete or a coach.

Laura Henry is a USA Triathlon Level I Certified Coach with The Right Fit MultiSports (www.therightfitmultisports.com). She has been involved in the sport of triathlon for five years. After a relatively inactive childhood, she participated in her first triathlon in 2010 and instantly fell in love with all three disciplines. As a swing shift worker with a demanding schedule, Laura knows what it’s like to set goals and train as a time-limited athlete on a non-traditional schedule, and she focuses on developing plans for other time-crunched athletes. Her enthusiasm and passion for helping athletes of all ability levels have allowed her to coach several athletes to success. Laura still trains and races competitively with Team Red, White & Blue (www.teamrwb.org), and aside from triathlon, her interests include traveling, hiking, photography, mountain biking, cooking, skiing and snow shoeing. You can reach her at laura@therightfitmultisports.com.

 

Cazenovia Triathlon
August 23, 2015
Registration is open.
 Click here to register
We are pleased to announce the 15th edition of the

Cazenovia Triathlon.
Set for Sunday, August 23, we welcome all former and future Caz Tri finishers.

The date has changed to August 23 to allow those racing Ironman Lake Placid and Iron Girl Syracuse plenty of time to rest and recover as well as helping extend the race season a bit further toward the fall.

Out 2015 goal is to make it all about the athletes and bring back what made us fall in love with about the sport of triathlon. We are offering the lowest registration price in Central New York through February 6, bringing back the race t-shirts, offering finisher medals for all of those who cross that finish line, and so much more. We have also changed our registration service to cut the cost on processing fees.

2015 also offers an exciting new race with the intermediate relay. Just like the sprint relay, athletes can race the intermediate distance in two- or three-person teams.

Registration for the 15th annual Cazenovia Triathlon opened Feb 3 at noon. For the most up to date race information, please visit either:

 www.CazenoviaTriathlon.org 

or

www.facebook.com/CazenoviaTriathlon

Registration can be found at:

 

Good luck with your upcoming training and we hope to see you in August.

MEMBER PROFILE
Tanya Gesek

Tell us about yourself. I am a psychologist who specializes in children and families. I have a private practice and also work part time for SUNY Upstate in the Pediatrics Department. I have lived in the Syracuse area since 2000 and am the mother of a 12-year-old son, Kai, who is a seventh grader at Jamesville-DeWitt Middle School.

How long have you been involved in triathlon and what made you take it up? I signed up for my first triathlon a little over four years ago when I turned 40. Call it an early midlife crisis!

Who is your hero? That is a hard question. There are so many people that I have been impressed with over time, not always someone famous. The heroes are the unknowns that overcome such adversity to bounce back and be better than ever. No one person fits that bill for me. 

What is your athletic background? I started as a dancer and dabbled in soccer throughout high school and college. I never really saw myself as an athlete but was always active.

What are your triathlon strengths and weaknesses? It’s funny, when I started to get back into fitness after my son was born, I picked up running. Now I feel like my running sucks. I guess many triathletes feel that way. I only learned to swim after I signed up for Iron Girl so that should be my weakest link but it is the sport I have grown to love the most.

What was your first triathlon and what do you remember most? Iron Girl 2011! Leading up to it I was terrified. Thanks to my first coach, Lisa Dolbear, what I remember most is feeling like I really belonged out there, like I had found my niche.

What is your favorite race and why? I have to say that Gillie Girl is my fave. Iron Girl was definitely my first and has a special place in my heart, but it feels good to do a truly local race for women that also supports a great cause. 

What was your worst race and why? All of them. . . just kidding. I guess my worst race ultimately has been the best learning moment for me. I had to DNF Du the Lakes one year due to a calf injury. Devastating but humbling at the same time.  I learned to listen to my body and let the smaller race go. I was registered for my 70.3 and I wanted to be whole for that. It ended up being a good call, but a rough moment.

What races are on your race calendar for 2015? I am registered for Ironman Lake Placid. Eek. Before that I hope to complete the Syracuse Half Marathon, Syracuse Springtime 10K, Triple T in Ohio, and Syracuse 70.3.  After that I will turn to zumba and hiking for a while.

What are this year’s goals? This year I am hoping to see just what I can push my body to do. Whereas I never would have thought it four years ago, finishing IMLP will be a truly amazing personal and fitness goal. I have a great coach in Jennifer Corona and great supporters in my friends, family and triathlon community. (Thanks, Joe!) Together, I think we got this.

In five years you hope to. . . In five years, I would love to have the fitness to realistically sign up for another Ironman.

Something most people don’t know about you. So maybe keep it to things people don’t know but want to know? I have two tattoos and have picked out my third, I danced on Club MTV in the 1980s and I love ABBA.

What triathlon has taught you. There is nothing you can’t do.

Discount for Tri Club Members

HITS Endurance is offering club members a 50% discount on registration to two of its summertime events, HITS North Country and HITS Kingston.

Located in Hague, HITS North Country is tucked away in the rugged Adirondacks, making it a perfect location for all Northeast area athletes. HITS North Country will be the set-ting for a breathtaking race unlike any other, beginning in scenic Hague and encompassing several local communities. Featuring one of the greatest open water swims in stunning Lake George, HITS North Country is a race to remember. Race weekend is June 27-28. Register here: http://hitstriathlonseries.com/hague-ny/

On July 11-12, head downstate for the inaugural HITS Kingston Triathlon.

Experience the splendor and beauty of the Hudson River, Ashokan Reservoir and Rondout Waterfront. You’ll be welcomed by warm weather, HITS’ knowledgeable tri staff and fellow athletes. Register here:  http://hitstriathlonseries.com/kingston-ny/

 

As an added challenge, all competitors who beat HITS race director Mark H. Wilson in the full distance race win a FREE entry to the full at HITS Kingston 2016.

Now for the best part: Members of the CNY Triathlon club will enjoy a 50% discount off of the base/full price for sprint, olympic, half and fll distances by using the code CNYSAVES. The code will be good up to 30 days out from each event.

 

CNY Triathlon Club | Box 434 | Dewitt | NY | 13214

February 2015 : issue 71

Wednesday, February 4th, 2015

CNY Triangle Logo
CNY TRI CLUB
Newsletter
February 2015
From the President

Dear Members,
I am looking out my office window and thinking to myself that in three months there will be leaves on the trees and the club will start Wednesday night trainings. Although it doesn’t feel like it, warmer weather will be here soon. How do you keep up your motivation to work out when it is snowing, blowing and freezing outside? Here are a few tips from Macca’s Musings: Stay Motivated! by Chris McCormack (read the full article here):

“Accept that a lack of motivation is normal, but refuse to accept that it will derail your drive and your goals.”

We all go through it. We don’t want to get out of bed or slog through the snow to the pool. The key is to remember we are human. Off days will happen. Some days we will win the battle of negative thoughts and some days we won’t. Just keep your eye on the prize.

“Keep it simple. Triathletes have a tendency to over-complicate things. Training programs and routine are important, but training in a social environment makes life easier.”

 

YES!! That is why the club has the WTF (Winter Training Facility). Don’t suffer alone! Suffer with friends :-)

“Manage your time! The biggest issue I see in people’s fight for motivation is that they try to cram too much into a tight time period, and the hassle of it takes away the enjoyment. Better time-management skills and better planning with realistic training time frames will ensure that burnout and ‘de-motivation’ are less likely.”

 

Ever have the panic moment where you think you aren’t doing enough? You aren’t training hard enough? You are way behind and totally going to get your butt kicked?  Then you go into overdrive and what happens? Training suffers and injury happens. Take time each week to plan. Allow yourself to control your training and not have the training control you.

“Understand how rest affects routines. When you’re getting your rest, it always seems easier for your body to fall into a good training routine. And when a routine becomes a sound foundation for your life, it is easier to keep the motivation high. This ties into the planning process.”

 

This is my favorite part of my training plan. Rest day! And naps.

“Be process-driven, not always goal-driven. Goals, when set, can be lofty and at times far away. For this reason it’s important to identify what the goal is–but even more important to know the process you have put in place to reach that goal. The process is the most important, and understanding how it relates to the bigger picture helps you remain in control of the journey.”

 

The journey is what is important and all the moments that lead up to the goal: the laughter, tears, failures and successes. All of these play an important part in the process to get us to our goal. Enjoy these times and journal them. When you cross the finish line you want to remember not only that moment, but everything (and everyone) that led you to that moment.

 

Stay warm and happy training!

 

Bridget

 

Next Board Meeting: Sunday, March 8, 6 p.m., WTF

 

What’s New at WTF

Computrainer classes are available on Thursdays and Saturdays. Priority is given to full-session signups. Schedules are available in the Tri Club calendar. The next full session with Sam begins February 21, with classes starting at 9:45 a.m. and the next full session with Rich starts February 28 at 8:15 a.m. Drop-in sessions with Lisa will be available Thursdays at 6:15 p.m.

See the club calendar to sign up.

Ask the Coach

This month, the newsletter begins a new feature, Ask the Coach. Members are urged to submit questions to newsletter@cnytriclub.org. The editor will then forward the question to that month’s coach. I hope this feature will provide valuable information as well as help you get to know the triathlon resources available in our area. This month’s coach is Kelly Covert.

Why do I need a coach? In my opinion, the top reasons triathletes need a coach are to help with life balance and injury prevention. A good coach will listen to your goals and create a plan that will help get you there, but they will also tell you when to rest, which is essential. They will help you figure out how to fit everything into your busy life that includes work, family and more. The more you have on your plate, the more you need a coach! A good coach provides the plan and then gives the support necessary to get through the plan. They become your sounding board, your place to go with questions, and most importantly, a good coach believes in you and for you when what you are doing can seem impossible.

What should I look for in a coach? It is so important that you find a coach that is a good fit for you, your goals and your lifestyle. Everyone should sit down with a potential coach and get an understanding of how that coach works, what is included in a coaching plan, and additionally, to see if you have a connection with that person. An athlete/coach relationship is very close, and you need to be able to fully trust that your coach is going to deliver on your goals as well as understand your particular circumstances. It’s important to remember that each coach is unique in his or her approach to training and coaching. For example, at Strong Body Whole Heart we offer triathlon coaching that includes life balance work, injury prevention and options to include what we like to call “heart coaching”–coaching that prepares you for not just the physical aspect of training and racing but also for the emotional aspect.

It is important to check out your coach’s experience and credentials. If you are planning on racing your first 140.6, choosing a coach who has had great success in coaching athletes to sprint tri victories might not be your best bet. If you are looking to combine triathlon training with other goals, such as weight loss, finding a coach that has certifications and experience in both of those areas is important.

How much does it cost? For a local coach, rates can range from around $150 per month and up, based on the kind of training you are seeking as well as the experience of the coach. When considering cost, I encourage athletes to think about coaching as an investment in their health, training and their life balance. You spend thousands on equipment, why not invest some of that money into yourself? A good coach offers far beyond a training plan. They offer insight, experience and the ability to look at your training and health from an objective viewpoint. That is something you will never get from a cookie cutter plan off the Internet!

  

Kelly Covert is a USAT Level 1 Certified Triathlon Coach with more than five years of coaching experience and over 10 years racing experience including triathlons of every distance. In addition, she is a Precision Nutrition Certified Nutrition Coach, as well as an integrative life coach. She is the co-host of the weekly audio podcast, The Strong Body Whole Heart Podcast, which you can subscribe to on iTunes. You can reach her at kelly@strongbodywholeheart.com and on the web at www.strongbodywholeheart.com.
Cazenovia Triathlon
August 23, 2015
Registration opened February 3.
 Click here to register
We are pleased to announce the 15th edition of the

Cazenovia Triathlon.
Set for Sunday, August 23, we welcome all former and future Caz Tri finishers.

The date has changed to August 23 to allow those racing Ironman Lake Placid and Iron Girl Syracuse plenty of time to rest and recover as well as helping extend the race season a bit further toward the fall.

Out 2015 goal is to make it all about the athletes and bring back what made us fall in love with about the sport of triathlon. We are offering the lowest registration price in Central New York through February 6, bringing back the race t-shirts, offering finisher medals for all of those who cross that finish line, and so much more. We have also changed our registration service to cut the cost on processing fees.

2015 also offers an exciting new race with the intermediate relay. Just like the sprint relay, athletes can race the intermediate distance in two- or three-person teams.

Registration for the 15th annual Cazenovia Triathlon opened Feb 3 at noon. For the most up to date race information, please visit either:

 www.CazenoviaTriathlon.org 

or

www.facebook.com/CazenoviaTriathlon

Registration can be found at:

www.runsignup.com/CazenoviaTriathlon

 

Good luck with your upcoming training and we hope to see you in August.

Triathlon Swim Clinics
Session 2 begins in April
 
MEMBER PROFILE
Eileen M. Clinton 

Tell us about yourself. I am currently the vice president of Risk Management at Brown and Brown Empire State. I have been in the insurance business over 33 years now. I moved around a bit with the job, from Massachusetts to Illinois to Binghamton to Syracuse, where I met my husband Jim, and had our son Matt who is now 23, a civil engineer near the city. I grew up in West Hartford, Conn., but always call Syracuse my home. I come from a family of five girls and one boy, so I learned at an early age how to compete!

How long have you been involved in triathlon and why did you take it up? I started triathlons in 2003, so it has been 12 wonderful years. I was an avid bicyclist for years, but discovered I had developed osteoporosis and my doctor said I needed impact to strengthen the bones. He suggested running or volleyball. I had run before, and started running on a more consistent basis. With summers at Cape Cod as a kid, I always liked to swim and I could bike, so triathlons became and still are my passion. I still have a lot of what I call “joy” moments training with friends, swimming at Jamesville or just being outdoors.

Who is your hero? My mom, Mary Ellen Higgision. She has been physically active all her adult life. When I was a kid, she would ask my dad to stop the car 6-8 miles from home and she would walk home for exercise (or to get out of a car full of screaming kids!). At age 85, she is the only one at her senior living center with a bike.

What is your athletic background? I made the varsity crew team at Assumption College in Worcester, Mass., and rowed varsity crew for three years. I always loved to bike, even as a kid.

What are your triathlon strengths and weaknesses? My strength I would say is my consistency. I have tried to place in my age group every year since 2003 and have accomplished this goal. I actually started to enjoy the swim the last couple of years, but alas, I’m not very fast. I have taken swim clinics for years to get faster and all that technique goes out the window when you start your mass swim in an event, so I would say that my swim time is something I still want to work on.

What was your first triathlon and what do you remember most? I think it was the Green Lakes Y Tri. I remember running neck and neck with my friend Mickey. My shoe lace untied and I had to make the decision to tie the lace or trip on my run to the finish. I decided to tie the lace and Mickey ran past me to the finish line. She earned that win.

What is your favorite race and why? I would say the First Syracuse 70.3. It was the first Ironman event in our area and the excitement and buzz was great. I also loved the flat run. I have relatives in Jamesville and I remember all of them out with their cowbells cheering me on.

What was your worst race and why? The 2013 Musselman 70.3. That was the year with the double fatalities. I learned of the first fatality Saturday night at the event dinner and it was so sad. Then I was on the bike course and came upon the woman who crashed. I saw the ambulance and we were told to stop.  The ref let us walk our bikes around the crash and mount up. It was not until I finished that I learned this young woman had died. This terrible tragedy at such a well run event was so sad. I will never forget it.

What races are on your race calendar for 2015? I always sign up for Cooperstown in May (yay, 55 degree water last year!), Delta Olympic, Syracuse 70.3 relay (I will do the bike section) and the Incredoubleman in September.

What are this year’s goals? My goal is to continue to place in my age group each year as I get older and not to crash. (I had a bad crash last September and it took me a while to heal).

In five years you hope to . . . Continue to have fun with the triathlon events and with my tri buddies. I also hope to qualify for Worlds and maybe tackle Ironman Lake Placid.

Something most people don’t know about you. I led bike trips for the national Sierra Club for several years, touring in places like Nova Scotia with groups. I loved it!

CNY Triathlon Club | Box 434 | Dewitt | NY | 13214

January 2015 : Issue 70

Thursday, January 1st, 2015

CNY Triangle Logo
CNY TRI CLUB
Newsletter
January 2015
From the President

HAPPY NEW YEAR!!

January 1 marks the beginning of training for the upcoming triathlon season. We will be logging lots of time in the pool (ah, the smell of chlorine in the morning), hours on the bike trainer (ow!) and miles and miles on the treadmill (or what I call the dreadmill) all for the purpose of kicking butt when we toe the start line for our goal race of the 2015 season. No matter what distance you are training for this season, know that you have a community that shares your passion for all things triathlon. Here is to wishing you a safe and great winter training!

It is the time of year again. The Annual Banquet and Elections will be held on Friday, February 6, at Twin Trees Too, 1029 Milton Ave., Solvay. Come share some good food and catch up with fellow members. More info and how to register is below.

2014 memberships have expired! Have you renewed your membership for 2015? Click on this link to Renew.

Again, Happy New Year!!!

Bridget Lichtinger
President
Next Board Meeting: Sunday, January 11, 6 p.m. WTF

Club Elections and Banquet 

It’s that time of year again for our annual club meeting and election! We hope you come to enjoy some good food and company! AND VOTE :-)  Our meeting will be held on Friday, February 6, at 6 p.m. at Twin Trees Too on Milton Ave. Cost is $10 per person and $5 for kids 15 and under.

I want say thank you to Mary Lou Plante for her service as Membership Director, Mindy Lu Gaffney and Stacey Keefe for their service and being the directors of Oneida Shores. We wish them the best.

We would also like to welcome our new to-be elected board member, Ken Geary. Read more about Ken in the Member Profile section of this newsletter.

On the Ballot:

Officers
Bridget Lichtinger – President
Ken Geary – Vice President
Cindy Mueller – Secretary

Jill Poniros – Treasurer

Executive Board officers for re-election
Eric Bansbach
Rich O’Neil
Sam Sampere
Ben Rabin

Tamara Danner – Membership Director

If you are interested in serving on the board or running for a position, email president@cnytriathlon.orgor membership@cnytriathlon.org.
SPIN FOR BRADY

Sunday, January 25CNY Tri’s WTF, Shoppingtown Mall, DeWitt

Time: 1-4 p.m.

Registration: $20.00

Donations: $5.00 for every 30 min of spinning

A prize for the top fundraiser, i.e. the one who spins the longest!

Refreshments will be provided

 

Brady Faith Center is a 501(c)(3) organization

Triathlon Swim Clinics
 

Having trouble viewing this? Click this link: Swim clinics

Having trouble viewing this? Click these links:

Adult Swim Program, Page 2

MEMBER PROFILE
Ken GearyTell us about yourself. I am the typical baby-boomer, 58 years old, in denial of the aging process and still trying to remain an athlete. Luckily I have lots of role models that are very successful in remaining fit and strong! I have two daughters, one still in college, and they are both athletes also.

 

How long have you been involved in triathlon and what made you take it up? I am relatively new to the sport, having started in 2011. I saw many of my running friends move to the sport as a way to diversify their fitness and try something new. It seemed like a natural progression, so I jumped in.

 

Who is your hero? I don’t have a single hero, there are just many excellent local role models, and I look up to many of them. If I had to single out someone it would be Brendan Jackson, my first coach and role model. Brendan is excellent at inspiring others to believe in themselves and guides, rather then pushes, his athletes into a pattern of success.

 

What is your athletic background? It’s diverse and sporadic. High school track and wrestling, softball and football as an early adult, then a long hiatus while my kids were growing up. My daughters and I took up tennis together (my daughter Jessica is captain of the Le Moynetennis team). Tennis led me to running to improve endurance, and three marathons later I decided to engage in the sport of triathlon.

 

What are your triathlon strengths and weaknesses? I would say that my strength is swimming and my weakness is running. It’s that aging-athlete curse, and a complete reversal of where I was four years ago. I attribute the swimming strength to the coaches I’ve had along the way, Brendan Jackson, followed by Bill Houser and then Karen Allen-Turner. All are great coaches and each has their own set of tricks to make you better.

 

What was your first triathlon and what do you remember most? My first triathlon was the Syracuse 70.3 in 2011. What I remember most was the cycle training, and how difficult it was at first. I trained with team Fleet Feet, had a great summer of rides and was inspired by the wide range of athletic abilities. Truly, anyone can do this sport if they are willing to put in the training time.

 

What is your favorite race and why? Easily it’s the Green Lakes Triathlon, mostly because it is the first race of the season and it’s a chance to catch up with all my tri friends that I barely see all winter.

 

What was your worst race and why? The 2013 Syracuse 70.3. It was incredibly hot and muggy, and I started the day realizing that I’d left my own personal fluid mix at home in the refrigerator. Use a checklist, it works. I bonked on the run because I couldn’t get cool. Then the deluge (rainstorm) opened up and they closed the race–not that I was going to complete it anyway. I gained a lot of respect for those that toughed out the race that day and completed it in that incredible energy-draining heat.

 

What races are on your race calendar for 2015?My calendar is just forming, but I have signed up for the Green Lakes Triathlon. I am sure there will be three or four others.

 

What are this year’s goals?

To improve my Olympic distance cycling time.

 

In five years you hope to … : I don’t have my goals set out that far, but I do want to improve each year and continue to train smarter and not harder. This year I am using the Computrainer to improve my cycling efficiency, and I am optimistic that I will see results.

 

Something most people don’t know about you. I am a Canadian, and I don’t love or follow hockey. I think that is why I had to leave the country and move here…

 

What triathlon has taught you. Role models are everywhere, and I get inspired by watching entry level athletes improve and flourish. It keeps me motivated to continue to work on all three sports. It is the main reason I joined CNY Triathlon, to be a part of a club that encourages athletes of all skill levels. I learn new things from fellow club members all the time, and we are lucky to have so many talented athletes and coaches that are willing to donate their time to us. It makes you want to pay it forward, and do the same for the newer club members and athletes.